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Places to Cruise Without a Passport

By Carnival Cruise Line

The Bahamas

New England and Canada

  • The Caribbean

Baja, Mexico

As luck would have it, you’ve suddenly got a few open days in your schedule and a yearning to travel somewhere exotic. Don’t let your lack of a passport stop you. Consider a cruise . If you take closed loop cruises (meaning your trip begins and ends at a U.S. port), you can sail to a variety of dreamy destinations as a U.S. citizen without a passport.

For “closed-loop” cruises, U.S. citizens will need to provide:

  • A boarding pass
  • A government photo I.D. if 16 years of age or older
  • And a certified birth certificate or certificate of U.S. naturalization

Starting and ending in Seattle or San Francisco, an Alaskan cruise takes you to charming waterfront cities and villages like Juneau, Skagway and Ketchikan. In Alaska, also known as the Land of the Midnight Sun, you can see spectacular, icy glaciers by boat or seaplane, watch for whales and try your hand at dog sledding.

whale in alaska jumping out of the water

A stop in Victoria, British Columbia offers a whole new set of adventures. Visit castles, take a ride on a horse-drawn trolley, stroll through beautiful Butchart Gardens or get your fill of shopping and dining downtown. When you arrive back in Seattle or San Francisco, take time to explore those cities for even more vacation fun.

You can cruise to The Bahamas from a number of U.S. ports along the Atlantic Coast. Located just southeast of Miami in the Atlantic Ocean, The Bahamas offers an ideal island getaway. With soft-sand beaches, vibrant coral reefs, and pastel-colored British colonial architecture , the Bahamian capital of Nassau makes a popular port of call for cruisers. In Freeport , you can shop till you drop at the Port Lucaya Marketplace or kayak through the mangroves at Lucayan National Park. At the south end of the island of Eleuthera, Princess Cays offers island resort living at its finest.

family splashing in the waters in the bahamas

If you’re looking for cruises that don’t require a passport, take a round trip sail to Bermuda from New York City , Baltimore , Charleston or one of two Florida ports of call. As Britain’s oldest colony, Bermuda offers wonderful historic attractions and plenty of opportunities for fun in the sun. Pink-sand beaches, beautiful blue waters and colorful coral reefs deliver the perfect recipe for sunning, swimming, sailing and snorkeling. Cap off a day of adventure in Bermuda with a sunset rum-tasting cruise .

beautiful beach with waves in warwick long bay in bermuda

If you’re looking for a different kind of cruise, explore parts of New England and Canada with New York City as an exciting starting and ending point. Spend a day soaking up history in Boston, Massachusetts, and tour the Charles River aboard an amphibious duck vehicle. Experience lighthouses, lobster bakes and craggy sea cliffs in Portland, Maine, and enjoy a trip to Saint John, a beautiful city on the Bay of Fundy in New Brunswick, Canada. A stop in the charming fishing village of Halifax, Nova Scotia offers beautiful gardens, more delicious seafood and double-decker bus tours . After you pull into port in the Big Apple, make sure to see a Broadway show, visit the Empire State Building and take a stroll through Central Park.

yellow leaves on the trees in boston

The Caribbean  

The Caribbean makes a popular destination for travelers considering a tropical cruise. For an easy round trip, you can begin and end in a number of U.S. cities including New York City, Galveston , Mobile , New Orleans and Tampa .

Western Caribbean locales in Mexico like Yucatán and Cozumel deliver exciting attractions, from ancient Mayan ruins to flamingo lagoons, and activities like swimming with dolphins, dune buggy rides, sailing, snorkeling, diving and zip lining.

man relaxing on a floaty in the caribbean waters

In the Eastern Caribbean, find dream destinations like Amber Cove in the Dominican Republic and Grand Turk in the Turks and Caicos archipelago. In Amber Cove, you can tour the Dominican outback, soak up the sun on Coconut Cove Beach, or ride the Waterfalls of Rio de Damajagua . On Grand Turk, enjoy swimming with stingrays, riding horses along the coast, or touring the island by ATV. The opportunities for adventure on a Caribbean cruise are endless.

When it comes to domestic cruises, nothing beats a trip to Hawaii . Explore beautiful spots spread across Maui , Kauai and the Big Island, and drink in the natural beauty only Hawaii delivers. On this exciting trip, you can deep sea fish for marlin, explore forest caves and waterfalls, soak up the sun on a black-sand beach and attend a traditional luau. U.S. departure ports for enjoyable Hawaiian cruises include San Francisco , San Diego , Long Beach and Honolulu .

na pali coastline, kauai in the hawaiian islands

Depart from the Californian cities of San Francisco, San Diego or Long Beach for a quick but memorable cruise to the Baja Peninsula in northern Mexico . Along the way, stop by Catalina Island for a day packed full of outdoor enjoyment . Kayak in and out of secret coves, zip line through the trees or try parasailing. In Ensenada , the “Cinderella of the Pacific,” you can ride horses along mountain trails, tour the wine country, shop for souvenirs and taste the local tequila.

the arch in cabo san lucas mexico

When traveling outside of the U.S. a passport is always recommended, but cruises are the exception to the rule. As long as you book a closed loop cruise, you can travel to certain destinations without a passport. Because international cruises in Europe and Asia require air travel, these vacations also demand a passport. When embarking on adventures by sea that don’t require a passport, make sure you have the proper cruise documentation.

Note: Onboard activities, shore excursions, and dining options may vary by  ship  and destination.

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6 Places to Cruise Without a Passport

Ramsey Qubein

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Table of Contents

1. Alaska-Canada

2. the bahamas, 4. u.s. northeast-canada, 5. other caribbean islands, book smart: get travel insurance, can you cruise without a passport.

If you thought you needed a passport to head overseas on every single trip, think again. Those long waits for passport applications or renewals , even if you finally secured an in-person appointment , aren't needed for some cruise vacations. 

The secret: closed-loop cruises. These are cruises that depart from a U.S. port, visit other countries, then return to a U.S. port of entry.

Instead of a passport, passengers will need to carry a valid U.S. driver’s license and proof of citizenship (a birth certificate or certificate of U.S. naturalization should suffice). Here are six cruises that don’t require a passport.

Wait a minute, you’re thinking. Alaska is a U.S. state. True, but Alaskan cruises can sometimes make stops in parts of British Columbia, like Victoria. If so, you can still visit as long as the cruise you take begins and ends in the U.S. 

Alaska is a popular vacation destination for its majestic scenery, glacier-filled landscape and outdoor adventures from dog-sledding to helicopter rides over the mountains. Seeing this part of the country by ship is one of the most convenient and beautiful ways to get around.

You can also find Alaskan cruises that start and end in Vancouver, British Columbia, which don't technically qualify as passportless cruises unless you cross the border from the U.S. into Canada by land using two pieces of approved government identification: an enhanced driver’s license (currently available to residents of Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Vermont and Washington state only) and a U.S. birth certificate.

With those two approved documents and traveling overland into Canada, it is possible to do a one-way cruise starting or ending in Vancouver as an American without a passport. Note that flying across the border would require a passport, however.

Royal Caribbean’s seven-night Northbound Alaska & Hubbard Glacier cruise aboard Radiance of the Seas, for example, departs from Vancouver and disembarks in Seward, Alaska.

The Bahamas is a Caribbean nation of islands and a popular cruise destination. Because of its proximity to the U.S., there are often shorter three-night cruises from Florida that make it easy to snag a good deal on a whim. Plus, it qualifies as an option for cruises without passports.

For many people without or in between passport applications, it can be disappointing to have to ignore last-minute deals . That’s no longer the case when you take advantage of cruises you can go on without a passport.

There's excellent shopping, dining and water sports activities in many ports like Nassau and Freeport. Another popular option is buying a day pass to mega resorts like Baha Mar and Atlantis , both of which welcome cruise visitors for the day.

Three-day cruises aboard Carnival Conquest depart Miami for the Bahamas, but return back to Miami. This means U.S. passengers don't need a passport for this closed-loop sailing.

Cruises to Bermuda are almost always closed-loop sailings from a U.S. port, save for a few transatlantic trips. This means you can visit the British territory without the worry of having a valid passport.

Bermuda has beautiful golf courses, historic forts and excellent dining. Many cruises overnight here to give passengers time to get out and explore. 

There are sailings aboard Celebrity Cruise Line's Celebrity Summit and Celebrity Eclipse that don't require passports as they depart a U.S. port, travel to Bermuda for a few nights, then return to a U.S. port.

If you’re looking for culture and history in the northeast, cruises that depart New England for parts of Canada are a great option.

Closed-loop cruises that depart and end in the U.S. negate the need for a passport (despite stops in Canadian ports), and like Alaskan cruises, one-way sailings remain an option if you choose to drive across the U.S.-Canada border and hold an enhanced driver’s license to cross.

From urban destinations like Boston and Halifax to picturesque destinations like Bar Harbor, Maine, and Saint John, New Brunswick, cruises like these trade palm trees and sunscreen for evergreens and rain jackets. This itinerary on Celebrity's Celebrity Summit ship doesn't require a passport because of the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative.

» Learn more: Your guide to the U.S.-Canada border crossing

There are a lot of options when it comes to visiting Caribbean islands.

U.S. cruise ports line the coastline including places like:

Fort Lauderdale.

Port Canaveral.

Galveston, Texas.

Mobile, Alabama. 

New Orleans.

As long as your cruise departs and returns to a U.S. port, you won’t need to bring a passport.

Various cruises that depart locations like these visit several islands in the region, including:

Grand Cayman.

St. Maarten.

Aside from water sports and outdoor adventure, you can visit markets, explore historic sites, meander through the town center on some islands and discover what makes the Caribbean a diverse region.

If you are wary about taking advantage of this benefit (perhaps some people in your party have a passport and others don’t), consider a cruise to U.S. island territories instead. These include Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (St. Thomas, St. Croix and St. John). Traveling by plane or ship to these island paradise destinations is considered a domestic trip. 

Carnival offers many Caribbean cruise options including sailings that depart and return to U.S. ports like Baltimore, Norfolk and New Orleans. These don't require a passport as they are closed-loop sailings.

» Learn more: The best travel credit cards right now

You can find cruises from either U.S. coast to Mexico with its glittering beaches, historic landmarks and incredible cuisine.

As long as the ship you are taking departs and returns to a U.S. port, these are some of the cruises that don’t require a passport. Passport-free, you can visit ports like:

Cabo San Lucas.

Puerto Vallarta. 

This four-night departure aboard Royal Caribbean’s Voyager of the Seas makes a visit to Cozumel before returning back to Texas.

» Learn more: Is cruise travel insurance worth the cost?

Before you embark on any sort of trip, consider travel insurance, which can protect your nonrefundable deposit in case something derails your plans. Purchasing cruise travel insurance or booking your trip with a credit card that includes coverage can also mitigate the risks of travel emergencies.

Some travel cards also offer cruise benefits, so it can be a smart money move to book your trip with a card that offers these perks along with travel insurance. Here are some cards that offer cruise and travel insurance perks:

Chase Sapphire Preferred Credit Card

on Chase's website

Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card

on Bank of America's website

The Platinum Card® from American Express

on American Express' website

Earn 75,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's over $900 when you redeem through Chase Travel℠.

Enjoy a one-time bonus of 75,000 miles once you spend $4,000 on purchases within 3 months from account opening, equal to $750 in travel.

Receive 60,000 online bonus points - a $600 value - after you make at least $4,000 in purchases in the first 90 days of account opening.

Earn 80,000 Membership Rewards® Points after you spend $8,000 on eligible purchases on your new Card in your first 6 months of Card Membership. Terms Apply.

• Get 25% more value out of your points when you book cruises through Chase.

• Book with your card to get automatic travel protections for your cruise.

• Redeem miles as a statement credit to cover spending on cruises.

• Book with your card to get automatic travel insurance coverage for your cruise.

• Earn 2x points on travel spending, including cruises and some ship excursions.

• Book with your card to get trip delay reimbursement, trip cancellation coverage and other travel assistance services.

• Get American Express Cruise Privileges Program benefits when you book at least five nights with eligible cruise lines.

• Cruise program benefits include $300 credit redeemable toward dining and spa services plus amenities like wine, chocolates and champagne.

Terms apply.

There are many more credit cards that offer travel insurance so if you're thinking about relying on a card to protect your cruise, it can be a good step to get familiarized with your options so the your trip is covered.

You can also purchase a standalone travel insurance policy if you feel that the protections provided by the card aren't sufficient. Either way, being aware of your options can bring some peace of mind, and not having to bring a passport to one of these destinations can make going on the trip even simpler.

Yes, there are several cruises without passport requirements that you can book. This is welcome news for those whose passports may have expired, for families who want to opt out of buying short-term passports for children , or haven't had a chance to renew their passport. 

However, it is preferable to have a passport with you (in the event you need medical care and have to stay in the country, for example). Being aware of your travel insurance options can also be a smart money move. Also check if the credit card you already have offers travel insurance or consider getting a card that includes this coverage for free.

A cruise is an easy way to visit many new places without having to unpack and pack again. When you discover a place you want to return to, you can plan another trip, perhaps with a new passport in hand.

AMERICAN EXPRESS DISCLAIMERS

Insurance Benefit: Trip Delay Insurance

Up to $500 per Covered Trip that is delayed for more than 6 hours; and 2 claims per Eligible Card per 12 consecutive month period.

Eligibility and Benefit level varies by Card. Terms, Conditions and Limitations Apply.

Please visit americanexpress.com/benefitsguide for more details.

Underwritten by New Hampshire Insurance Company, an AIG Company.

Insurance Benefit: Trip Cancellation and Interruption Insurance

The maximum benefit amount for Trip Cancellation and Interruption Insurance is $10,000 per Covered Trip and $20,000 per Eligible Card per 12 consecutive month period.

How to maximize your rewards

You want a travel credit card that prioritizes what’s important to you. Here are some of the best travel credit cards of 2024 :

Flexibility, point transfers and a large bonus: Chase Sapphire Preferred® Card

No annual fee: Bank of America® Travel Rewards credit card

Flat-rate travel rewards: Capital One Venture Rewards Credit Card

Bonus travel rewards and high-end perks: Chase Sapphire Reserve®

Luxury perks: The Platinum Card® from American Express

Business travelers: Ink Business Preferred® Credit Card

1x-5x 5x on travel purchased through Chase Travel℠, 3x on dining, select streaming services and online groceries, 2x on all other travel purchases, 1x on all other purchases.

75,000 Earn 75,000 bonus points after you spend $4,000 on purchases in the first 3 months from account opening. That's over $900 when you redeem through Chase Travel℠.

1.5x-2x Earn unlimited 2 points for every $1 spent on travel and dining purchases and unlimited 1.5 points for every $1 spent on all other purchases.

60,000 Receive 60,000 online bonus points - a $600 value - after you make at least $4,000 in purchases in the first 90 days of account opening.

cruises from baltimore no passport

The Tourist Checklist

The 8 Cruise Destinations That Don’t Require a Passport

Embarking on a cruise adventure can be a thrilling experience, and the great news is, you don’t always need a passport for this journey. The idea of setting sail into the horizon, with the promise of new experiences, can be enticing and liberating, especially when it’s hassle-free.

Imagine the ease of traveling without the need to go through the lengthy process of passport renewal or application. This possibility opens up a world of travel opportunities, inviting you to explore and indulge in the wonders of cruising.

Cruises that don’t require a passport offer the perfect blend of convenience and exploration. These trips often begin and end in the same port within the United States, termed as ‘closed-loop’ cruises.

Such cruises are a boon for those looking to take a break from the ordinary, offering a getaway that’s both accessible and extraordinary. The key lies in the simplicity of the process – less paperwork, and more enjoyment.

With just a few basic travel documents, including a government-issued photo ID and proof of citizenship, you can embark on these unique cruises. This simplified documentation process makes these cruises especially appealing to those who prefer not to or cannot use a passport.

Cruise Destinations That Don’t Require a Passport

The caribbean.

The Caribbean Cruises

The Caribbean is a treasure trove of sun, sea, and diverse cultures. With options for closed-loop itineraries from numerous U.S. cities, including Miami, New York, and New Orleans, the Caribbean offers a wide array of experiences.

From the historic and adventure-packed Eastern Caribbean to the vibrant and nature-rich Southern Caribbean, and the culturally diverse Western Caribbean, there’s a slice of paradise for every traveler. Engage in activities like ziplining, waterfall swimming, and quad bike riding, or relax on pristine beaches.

Not just a destination for leisure, the Caribbean offers a journey through history and culture, with opportunities to explore ancient ruins, rainforests, and engage in wildlife encounters. This destination caters to a broad spectrum of interests, making it a perfect choice for a passport-free tropical getaway.

West Coast Cruise

Cruising along the West Coast of the United States offers a unique opportunity to explore the diverse landscapes and vibrant cities of California, Washington, and Oregon without needing a passport.

These cruises typically meander along California’s stunning coastline, allowing you to experience the iconic beauty of places like Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego. Up north, Seattle, Washington, and Astoria, Oregon serve as scenic ports, each with its own charm.

Seattle, known for its coffee culture and markets, and Astoria, with its adventure-rich history, provide distinct experiences. West Coast cruises are ideal for those looking for a quick getaway or for first-time cruisers wanting a taste of the Californian lifestyle and the broader West Coast.

Whether it’s for a short break or a longer voyage, these cruises offer a perfect blend of relaxation, adventure, and sightseeing along America’s stunning Pacific coastline.

Bahamas

Set sail to the Bahamas, a dreamy destination for a passport-free adventure! Embrace the joy of tropical escapades right from various U.S. ports along the Atlantic Coast. Here, the sparkling waters and sun-kissed beaches of Nassau invite you to dive into its vibrant coral reefs and explore pastel-colored British colonial architecture.

Freeport offers a unique blend of local culture and natural beauty, with opportunities to kayak through the mangroves at Lucayan National Park or indulge in some serious shopping at Port Lucaya Marketplace. For an exclusive resort experience, head to Princess Cays at the southern end of Eleuthera.

Each of these Bahamian gems is accessible through a variety of closed-loop cruises, ranging from short weekend getaways to more extended voyages from ports like New York, providing a plethora of options to suit every traveler’s schedule and preference​.

Bermuda cruise

Bermuda, a slice of paradise for those seeking a blend of British charm and island ease, offers a unique escape. Depart from East Coast ports like New York City, Baltimore, or Charleston and immerse yourself in this idyllic destination known for its pink-sand beaches and crystalline waters.

Here, you can engage in a variety of activities, from snorkeling to sunset rum-tasting cruises. Its size allows for ample exploration within a short timeframe, and several itineraries offer overnight stays, letting you experience both the serene days and lively nightlife of Bermuda.

With historical sites like St. Peter’s Church and the National Museum of Bermuda, you can delve deep into the island’s rich past while enjoying its present-day beauty and cultural offerings. When cruising to Bermuda, you’re not just visiting an island; you’re stepping into a blend of history, luxury, and natural splendor.

Mexico, Western Caribbean

Mexico, a vibrant land of rich culture and stunning natural beauty, is another splendid destination for a passport-free cruise. Depart from Californian cities like San Francisco, San Diego, or Long Beach and set course for the Baja Peninsula.

Along the way, you might stop at Catalina Island, where outdoor activities like kayaking, zip-lining, and parasailing await. Once in Mexico, be ready to explore attractions from the flamingo lagoons of Yucatán to the historical allure of Cozumel.

These Western Caribbean locales offer an array of activities such as swimming with dolphins, exploring ancient Mayan ruins, and thrilling zip-line adventures. Whether you’re in the mood for cultural exploration or seeking adrenaline-pumping activities, Mexican Riviera voyages from the West Coast provide an eclectic mix of experiences.

Panama Canal

cruises from baltimore no passport

A cruise to the Panama Canal is a journey through one of the modern world’s most impressive engineering feats. For travelers without a passport, there’s an option to embark on a round-trip cruise from Florida that avoids making port in Colombia, adhering to the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative.

This route allows you to experience the awe-inspiring Panama Canal without needing a passport. As you navigate through this engineering marvel, you’re surrounded by lush rainforests and vibrant wildlife, offering a unique and unforgettable experience.

The Panama Canal is not just a passage between oceans; it’s a gateway to a myriad of natural wonders and historical significance. This cruise is an adventure that combines the thrill of exploration with the marvels of modern ingenuity, making it a must-see destination for travelers.

Alaska Cruises

Alaska cruises are a feast for the eyes and soul, perfect for nature enthusiasts and outdoor adventurers alike. Embark from Seattle or San Francisco and journey to the mesmerizing ‘Land of the Midnight Sun’.

Your Alaskan adventure includes visits to quaint waterfront towns like Juneau, Skagway, and Ketchikan. Experience the grandeur of icy glaciers, either by boat or seaplane, and keep an eye out for majestic whales.

Activities like dog sledding add to the excitement. Plus, a stop in Victoria, British Columbia, adds an international flair to your journey, offering a mix of historical and modern attractions, from castles to trolley rides and lush gardens. This cruise guarantees a vacation filled with remarkable memories and breathtaking sights.

Hawaii Cruises

Hawaii, an American gem, promises an exotic and exhilarating experience. This tropical haven is known for its black-sand beaches, volcanic landscapes, and rich cultural heritage. Hawaiian cruises offer diverse activities, from surfing and snorkeling to sampling the local cuisine and experiencing traditional hula dancing.

The state’s allure isn’t just in its beaches and volcanoes; its culinary scene and cultural experiences are equally enchanting. With Hawaii’s welcoming atmosphere and breathtaking scenery, your vacation there is bound to be unforgettable.

This destination proves that you don’t have to leave the U.S. to find a paradise that feels worlds away. A Hawaiian cruise is an ideal choice for those seeking a unique blend of adventure, relaxation, and cultural immersion.

Final Thoughts

Exploring the world by sea is a thrilling experience, and the great news is, you don’t always need a passport for these adventures. From the rugged beauty of Alaska to the sun-kissed shores of the West Coast, the options are diverse and exciting.

Each destination offers its unique blend of culture, scenery, and experiences, proving that incredible journeys await just a cruise away, even without a passport. These destinations not only cater to diverse interests but also make cruising more accessible, inviting everyone to indulge in the joys of travel​.

Funky Cruise

11 Places to Cruise Without a Passport

cruises without passport

Yearning for sea adventures but your passport’s AWOL? With closed-loop cruises , you have a hassle-free option to sail sans passport. These special voyages start and end at the same U.S. port, simplifying travel documents. But hold your sea horses! Understanding the specifics — like when a birth certificate and government-issued photo ID suffice — is key to avoiding a vacation shipwreck.

In this guide, we’ll unravel the mystery of passport-free cruises, highlighting everything from legal must-knows to dream destinations. Discover hidden gems from Alaskan beauty to Caribbean charm without the passport panic. 🚢✨

Can You Go on a Cruise Without a Passport?

Yes, you can indeed set sail on a grand adventure without a passport, but there’s more to this story than meets the eye. “Passport-free cruises” are typically closed-loop sailings, embarking and disembarking passengers at one consistent U.S. port. This unique category of travel is a lifesaver for those with an aversion to paperwork or an unfortunate case of “I thought the passport was in the drawer!”

red passport on top of a luggage

However, common misconceptions can lead to choppy waters. Many believe any cruise departing from the U.S. doesn’t require a passport but beware: certain cruise lines might still demand one , and if your cruise involves air travel to meet the ship, a passport is non-negotiable.

Legally, while closed-loop cruises don’t require a passport, the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) mandates proof of citizenship and identity. Here’s where your birth certificate and government-issued photo ID come in handy, or better yet, an Enhanced Driver’s License (EDL).

Why Consider a No-Passport Cruise?

Embarking on a no-passport cruise is like finding a golden ticket inside your chocolate bar — it’s all about serendipity and convenience. These cruises eliminate the hassle of passport renewal and are perfect for last-minute travel plans, when time is tight, and governmental red tape is a no-go.

passport with sunglasses on top of a denim jacket

No-passport cruises are particularly beneficial for domestic travelers keen on exploring the U.S.’s scenic beauty, from the majestic glaciers of Alaska to the vibrant cultures of the Caribbean . They’re also a godsend for family travel — because we all know getting passports for the whole gang can be as fun as a sunburn.

Ideal Places to Cruise Without a Passport

Pacific cruises without a passport.

cruise ship docked on a port in Canada

Did you know the tranquil and thrilling Pacific awaits you, even without a passport? That’s right, you can dive into diverse cultures, stunning natural beauty, and intriguing history on a closed-loop cruise that begins and ends in the same U.S. port.

Hawaii and Other Hawaiian Islands

Hawaii’s dramatic landscapes, from its black sand beaches to lush rainforests and cascading waterfalls, are just the beginning. Each island offers a unique bouquet of experiences. Attend a traditional luau, visit historic sites like Pearl Harbor, or just relax on the sun-soaked beaches of Maui. And with departure ports like San Francisco, San Diego, and Long Beach, your tropical getaway is closer than you think.

The call of the wild has never been more enticing! Alaska, known for its majestic wildlife, towering glaciers, and charming towns, is a frontier that promises adventure at every turn. Imagine watching a whale breach beside your cruise ship or witnessing the solemn beauty of glaciers calving into the icy waters.

From the historic streets of Skagway to the panoramic vistas of the Inside Passage, every moment is a postcard in the making. And guess what? Some itineraries offer a delightful detour through British Columbia’s storybook locales. Remember, while your cruise may be passport-free , you’ll want your government-issued ID and birth certification on hand for any impromptu Canadian jaunts!

Mexican Riviera

Fancy a slice of the good life? The Mexican Riviera is your go-to! Ports like Cabo San Lucas, Mazatlán, and Puerto Vallarta are brimming with activities. Picture yourself riding camels in the desert, sipping wine in Ensenada’s burgeoning vineyards, or simply soaking up the sun on a picture-perfect beach. The region’s rich culture and vibrant nightlife add to the allure, making it a top pick for travelers seeking both relaxation and adventure.

Caribbean Cruises Without a Passport

looking through a cave entrance into the sea

The Caribbean, with its sun-drenched beaches and turquoise waters, welcomes cruisers sans passport, thanks to the magic of closed-loop cruises. Let’s dive into these tropical paradises one by one:

The Bahamas

Imagine stepping off your cruise ship and straight onto the soft sands of the Bahamas. You can turn this dream into reality, even without a passport! Perfect for shorter three-night escapades or week-long retreats, the Bahamas serves up a platter of activities.

From the famed Atlantis Resort to the natural wonder of the Exuma Cays, there’s never a dull moment. Water sports, duty-free shopping, and yes, those adorable swimming pigs, are all part of the Bahamian voyage. And the best part? Proximity to the U.S. allows for a whirlwind adventure even for the time-pressed traveler.

U.S. Virgin Islands

The U.S. Virgin Islands, a sprinkle of American paradise in the Caribbean Sea, is another haven for travelers without a passport. Each island—St. Thomas, St. John, and St. Croix—boast unique offerings. Dive into duty-free shopping in Charlotte Amalie, embrace the tranquility of St. John’s untouched forests, or delve into the rich history of St. Croix. Here, the United States feels both familiar and thrillingly different.

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, welcomes you with open arms and a vibrant culture. Explore the colorful streets of San Juan, the lush El Yunque Rainforest, and the history-soaked walls of ancient forts.

As the sun sets, find yourself mesmerized by the bioluminescent bays or the rhythms of bomba and salsa. It’s a place where the Old World romances the new, and your cruise ship grants you a front-row seat to the spectacle.

Ports like Cozumel , Cabo San Lucas, and Costa Maya are accessible from various U.S. cities, offering a mosaic of experiences from camelback rides in the desert to tranquil moments in the coastal towns. And don’t get us started on the cuisine; your taste buds are in for a fiesta!

Other Caribbean Islands

The adventure doesn’t stop! Many cruises design itineraries encompassing islands like Grand Cayman, where you can mingle with stingrays, or St. Maarten, with its split Dutch and French personality. While some stops may require passports, many don’t, expanding your horizon beyond the typical.

Whether it’s the spice of local cuisines, the thrill of zip-lining through forests, or the calm of secluded beaches, these islands are jewels in the Caribbean crown.

Atlantic Cruises Without a Passport

blue ocean and a mountain

Who says you need a passport to experience the magic of the Atlantic? Not us! Here are some spectacular destinations you can explore without that little booklet:

U.S. Northeast-Canada

How about savoring the flavors of New England and Canada in one go? From the rocky shores of Maine to the vibrant cultural tapestry of Quebec City, these cruises offer a rich blend of history, nature, and French-Canadian flair. Picture feasting on lobster in Bar Harbor followed by poutine in Quebec City — delicious!

Alaska-Canada

While your cruise must start and end in the U.S., some Alaskan cruises make pit stops in dreamy British Columbian spots like Victoria, renowned for its lush Butchart Gardens. However, it’s essential to carry specific documents, like your birth certificate and government ID, for these little side adventures.

Mix a bit of British charm with island soul, and voilà, you’ve got Bermuda! This Atlantic gem is known for its pink sand beaches, turquoise waters, and of course, the mysterious Bermuda Triangle. Departing from ports like Baltimore, Bayonne, Boston, Manhattan, Norfolk, or Charleston, you can delve into the island’s rich maritime history, explore crystal caves, or tee off at a world-class golf course, all without needing a passport.

The East Coast: A No-Passport Cruise Adventure

cruise ship docked by the new york port

East Coast cruises offer a unique blend of urban glamour and serene coastal charm, perfect for no-passport adventures. Depart from bustling ports like Bayonne, Baltimore , Boston, Brooklyn, Manhattan, or Norfolk , and set sail on an itinerary brimming with diversity:

  • New York’s Skyline: Marvel at towering skyscrapers and iconic landmarks.
  • Historic Charm: Explore Newport’s opulent Gilded Age Mansions and the quaint, picturesque streets of New England towns.
  • Natural Splendor: Experience the tranquil lakes of Bar Harbor and visit majestic lighthouses dotting the coastline.
  • Canadian Contrast: Delight in historic Halifax’s vibrant downtown and the majestic Saguenay fjord.

These are often closed-loop sailing, and provide a comprehensive East Coast experience without the need for a passport, merging cultural exploration with breathtaking natural vistas.

Why It’s Best to Travel With a Passport

Despite the allure of no-passport-required adventures, we’d be remiss not to highlight the security and peace of mind a passport provides. Imagine needing to fly home unexpectedly from a foreign port because of an emergency, or getting the chance for an impromptu jaunt to a fascinating nearby country.

passport and camera on top of the world map

A passport becomes your golden ticket! Plus, cruise lines highly recommend carrying one, as it streamlines the check-in process and helps with onshore excursions. In the world of travel, it’s always better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it. Safe and safe travels! 🌍✈️🚢

Preparing for Your No-Passport Cruise

woman sitting beside a red luggage

  • Documentation : No passport? No problem for closed-loop sailings! Bring a state-issued birth certificate and government photo ID. Under the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, Enhanced Driver’s Licenses are valid for travel within North American countries.
  • Cruise Line Requirements : Each line, from Norwegian Cruise Line to Royal Caribbean, has unique boarding protocols. Double-check these, especially for sailings departing from diverse locations like Florida ports, New Orleans, or East Coast ports.
  • Itinerary Awareness : Understand your route, whether you’re soaking in New Orleans’ vibrancy, exploring Hawaiian islands, or uncovering ancient Mayan ruins. Different departure points offer varied experiences.
  • Timely Returns : For round-trip adventures, especially those involving international stops, punctuality is key, particularly post-shore excursions.
  • Health Advisories : Stay updated on health guidelines, even for domestic trips. Vaccinations and other precautions are paramount for safe international travel.
  • Packing Wisely : Prepare for your destinations’ climates using a complete packing checklist . Sunscreen for the Bahamas’ white sand beaches, or warmer attire for Nova Scotia’s cooler temperatures, ensure comfort.

If you’re itching for an adventure but don’t want to dig out your passport or deal with all the paperwork, no-passport cruises are your ticket to paradise.

cruise ship docked by the port in the day

Whether you’re lured by the Caribbean’s sun-dappled shores, Alaska’s wild majesty, or the cultural tapestries of Mexico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, these cruises promise hassle-free departures straight into relaxation and discovery. So, why tether your wanderlust to a passport’s pages? Embark on a no-passport cruise, and let the horizons unfurl your story of adventure, serenity, and unforgettable memories. Bon voyage! 🚢✨

What cruises can you take without a passport?

You can embark on several cruises without a passport, including destinations like Alaska, The Bahamas, Bermuda, Cozumel, New England and Canada, the Caribbean, Hawaii, and Baja, Mexico. Additionally, your travel can extend to Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and other Caribbean islands, provided you’re on closed-loop cruises, meaning your journey starts and ends at the same U.S. port.

Can you take a cruise out of the country without a passport?

Yes, you can take a cruise out of the country without a passport if it’s a closed-loop cruise, a specific type of itinerary that major cruise lines offer, which begins and concludes at the same U.S. port. These cruises, operating under an international agreement called the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, permit U.S. citizens to travel to destinations within the Western Hemisphere without a passport.

Can you go on a royal cruise without passport?

No, Royal Caribbean, like several other major cruise lines, typically requires passengers to have a valid passport for travel, even for closed-loop sailings that wouldn’t legally require one. This policy helps ensure that, in case of emergencies that necessitate flying back to the U.S. from a foreign port, passengers can do so without legal complications or delays. Always check the specific requirements before booking.

Can I go on a cruise without a visa?

The necessity of a visa depends on the cruise itinerary and your nationality. For cruises without a passport we discussed, like those to Hawaii, Alaska, the Caribbean, or certain destinations within proximity to the U.S., American citizens generally don’t need a visa due to the closed-loop nature of these cruises.

cruises from baltimore no passport

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Where can I cruise without a passport?

Melinda Crow

Editor's Note

At TPG, we always recommend cruising with a passport, but there are many reasons why you might want to set sail without one.

What if an opportunity pops up on short notice, and you don't have a passport yet? Or what if you forgot to renew yours when it expired? What if it's only a three-night cruise to the Bahamas, and the passport application fee is almost as much as the cruise fare? Or, maybe you have children nearing age 16 and can't justify paying for passports that will only be good for five years.

First of all, do you even need a passport to cruise ? The answer is often but not always. You have options to cruise without a passport because not every sailing requires them. Thanks to an international agreement called the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative , U.S. citizens can cruise on certain itineraries within North American countries using government-issued identification (like a valid driver's license) and proof of citizenship (like a government-issued birth certificate).

The cruises that you don't need a passport for are closed-loop sailings, which depart from and return to the same port within the U.S. One-way sailings from one U.S. port to another or from a U.S. port to a foreign one would require a passport.

For more cruise news, reviews and tips, sign up for TPG's cruise newsletter .

Before we go further, let's clarify that when we talk about cruising without a passport, we're referring to pricey passport books that some travelers do not wish to purchase. Passport cards can also be used for identification when cruising in all the places we are about to discuss; these cards are a low-cost alternative to traveling with your driver's license and birth certificate.

Let's look at the options for where you can cruise without a passport.

cruises from baltimore no passport

Cruising to Alaska is one of the easiest ways to experience all the state offers. You'll have opportunities to see glaciers and wildlife; stroll the streets of charming coastal towns; eat your fill of local crab legs and salmon; and enjoy nature on a kayak, zip line or hike.

If you're interested in cruising to Alaska without a passport, look for itineraries that begin (and end) in Seattle , San Francisco or southern California ports, such as Los Angeles or Long Beach, California. The most common length for these closed-loop Alaska cruises operated by the major cruise lines is seven nights. Cruises early or late in the season might be only four or five nights, and trips departing from LA are usually 14 nights.

What if you really want to cruise one-way from Canada to Alaska (or vice versa)? Although Canada prefers U.S. citizens who arrive by sea or land to have a passport book, it is not required as long as they have proper identification and proof of citizenship. The U.S., however, requires one of the following WHTI-approved forms of identification for entries by land or sea: passport card, enhanced driver's license, I-872 American Indian card or trusted traveler program IDs like Nexus, Sentri and Fast.

Technically, if you have one of those forms of ID but not a passport book, you can take a one-way Alaska cruise — as long as you don't have to fly to or from Canada.

More complications arise for non-passport holders who book shore excursions that involve crossing from Alaska to Canada. White Pass and Yukon Route train rides are good examples. White Pass and Yukon Route allows cruise passengers to go on the three-hour train excursion without a passport but doesn't allow them to take any longer routes. That's their policy, not a legal requirement.

This means that Alaska cruises are one instance when the passport card would be a handy alternative to traveling with both an ID card and a birth certificate. It opens up one-way itineraries.

Related: The best Alaska cruise for every type of traveler

cruises from baltimore no passport

A cruise to the Caribbean transports you to tropical islands bathed in turquoise waters. Whether you seek warm beaches, cool drinks, water sports or cultural education, you can find a Caribbean cruise to fit the bill.

It's easy to cruise without a passport in the Caribbean: Just book one of the many closed-loop, round-trip sailings departing from a U.S. port. Most major cruise lines offer sailings that range between three and 15 nights from ports like Galveston, Texas; New Orleans; multiple ports in Florida (including Miami and Fort Lauderdale); Charleston, South Carolina; Baltimore; Bayonne, New Jersey; and New York City.

Most Caribbean islands participate in the WHTI, but it's always best to check the details specific to the ports of call included in your itinerary. Don't forget that islands such as Puerto Rico, St. Thomas, St. John and St. Croix are U.S. territories, so visits never require passports for U.S. citizens.

Related: The best Caribbean cruises for every type of traveler

cruises from baltimore no passport

Bermuda is a British Overseas Territory, lying 643 miles off the coast of North Carolina. Hop on a cruise ship for a direct route to the island's famous beaches and golf courses. Spring and summer are the prime seasons to visit, but cruises are possible throughout the year.

Cruising without a passport to Bermuda is also easy. Apart from a few isolated cruises stopping in Bermuda as they come or go from other destinations, there are no one-way Bermuda cruises to confuse the situation. If you plan to sail without a passport, be wary of any Bermuda cruise longer than 10 nights. Those are likely to be point-to-point cruises that happen to include Bermuda.

Passport-free cruises to Bermuda include ample five- to 10-night sailings from the East Coast ports of Baltimore, Bayonne, Boston and Manhattan. Occasional itineraries also pop up throughout the Bermuda season departing from Norfolk, Virginia; Charleston; and the Florida ports of Miami, Port Canaveral (near Orlando) and Jacksonville.

Related: Does it make sense to take a short cruise to Bermuda?

cruises from baltimore no passport

Long known for delightful strands of beach and access to every imaginable form of water fun under the subtropical sun, the Bahamas are the ideal destination for easy and quick cruise vacations.

Skip the passport on three- to five-night Bahamas cruises sailing round-trip on most major cruise lines from the eastern Florida ports of Jacksonville, Port Canaveral, Fort Lauderdale's Port Everglades and Miami.

A few longer, seven- to 15-night itineraries stop in the Bahamas on their way into the Caribbean. Departures from Bayonne, Manhattan, Baltimore and Charleston will often get you weeklong Bahamas itineraries, as will sailings from Tampa, Galveston and New Orleans.

Related: Best Bahamas cruise tips for first-timers and repeat visitors alike

cruises from baltimore no passport

Our southern neighbor boasts two coastlines of cruise fun. Like most tropical cruise destinations, the top draws are the beaches and the ocean; however, cruise ports in Mexico also give you access to ancient Mayan ruins, delicious cuisine and an abundance of land activities.

Mexico's Caribbean and Pacific coasts are both accessible to cruisers who do not hold passports. If you want to visit Mexico's eastern shores, you can find three- to 15-night cruises to Costa Maya, Cozumel and Progreso. Sailings depart Florida from Miami, Tampa, Fort Lauderdale and Port Canaveral; you can also find itineraries from New Orleans, Galveston and Mobile, Alabama.

Western Mexico, often referred to as the Mexican Riviera, includes the ports of Cabo San Lucas, Puerto Vallarta, Mazatlan and Ensenada, among others. Cruises with several major lines depart San Diego, San Pedro port in LA and Long Beach for voyages lasting anywhere from three to 10 nights.

Related: The best Mexico cruises for every type of traveler

cruises from baltimore no passport

From water sports to American history and Hawaiian culture, there's a lot to experience on a Hawaii cruise . The best part might be the ability to hop from island to island, sampling the flavors of each as you go.

Closed-loop Hawaii cruises that don't require passports come in two varieties. The short option is to fly to Honolulu and take a seven- or 10-night cruise on Norwegian Cruise Line 's Pride of America. This is the only large cruise ship allowed to operate entirely within the Hawaiian Islands without visiting a foreign port.

Small-ship cruise operator UnCruise Adventures also offers seven-night, inter-island Hawaiian sailings. The American-flagged ships only cruise to and from U.S. ports, so no passport is needed, as would be the case on any domestic trip.

The long-cruise options consist of 14- to 18-night round-trip sailings from San Diego, LA (Long Beach and San Pedro) and San Francisco. You won't need a passport for these closed-loop sailings, but you do need to be prepared for multiple days at sea as you cross the Pacific from California to Hawaii.

Beware of 20-plus-night cruises that are round-trip sailings from the West Coast and would seem to fit the bill for closed-loop cruises that don't require passports. Most of these cruises don't work because they also include stops in French Polynesia, which is outside of the WHTI agreement. Passports are required for the islands in the South Pacific, which means they're required for the entire cruise.

Related: The best Hawaii cruises for every type of traveler

Canada and New England

cruises from baltimore no passport

Cruises up North America's East Coast allow you to take in historical sights of early Americana, stand atop rugged cliffs on the coast of Nova Scotia or revel in the French culture of Quebec.

Mainstream cruise lines operate numerous cruises along the U.S. and Canadian coasts that don't require passports. These depart from the ports of Bayonne, Baltimore, Boston, Manhattan, Brooklyn and occasionally Norfolk. The majority of these New England and Canada cruises are weeklong fall sailings; however, a handful depart at other times of the year or are a touch longer, ranging from eight to 10 nights.

Related: The best cruises to Canada and New England

Some cruise lines also offer one-way cruises in both directions between Canada and New England. These itineraries, like Alaska cruises, might be possible without a passport book. This is the case as long as your plans don't include flying into or out of Canada and your cruise line allows you to cruise with either a passport card or other acceptable form of identification and proof of citizenship.

We checked with a few lines for you. Princess, Holland America and Celebrity all strongly recommend passport books, but they allow one of the WHTI forms of identification. Again, the passport card opens up one-way possibilities, assuming you aren't flying and your cruise only includes Canada and the U.S.

Bottom line

While cruising with a passport is always recommended, it's not required by law in certain circumstances. Closed-loop cruises from U.S. ports that visit Bermuda, Canada, the Caribbean and Mexico are part of an international agreement that allows U.S. citizens to cruise without a passport. In these cases, government-issued identification and proof of U.S. citizenship are acceptable alternatives to a passport book.

Passport cards are an affordable and unquestionable alternative to carrying an ID and birth certificate. If you want to go this route, know they are not valid for travel by air into or out of any foreign country, including Canada, Mexico, Bermuda or Caribbean countries — which is the primary reason most travel advisers urge cruisers to have a passport book.

As we've shown, you have plenty of options for where to cruise without a passport, and many travelers do so without incident. However, anything from engine trouble on your cruise ship to bad weather or an accident in port might necessitate a flight home from a foreign country. This would put you in an awkward position if you didn't have a passport.

Plus, as much fun as simple round-trip cruises are, passports open up additional vacation possibilities in the form of longer, point-to-point and overseas trips. Don't dismiss registering for a passport, even as you consider where you can cruise without one.

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The Vacationer • Cruises • Cruise Guides

Cruises Without a Passport: Here’s Everywhere You Can Cruise Without a Passport in 2024

Cruises Where You Do Not Need a Passport

When you think about cruises, you probably think of international travel. After all, most cruises departing from a U.S. port are headed into international waters, whether you’re sailing from Florida into the Caribbean or from Boston up into Canada. And when we think of international travel, we often think of one key requirement: a passport. 

However, despite this, you don’t actually need a passport to go on every cruise. No, that doesn’t mean you’ll be stuck on New England small ship sailings or taking a river cruise down the Mississippi. You can take a wonderfully warm, tropical Caribbean cruise away from the States without the hassle of acquiring or renewing a passport .

Here’s how it works.

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Table of Contents

Cruises That Do Not Require a Passport

Certain cruises do not require cruisers to present a passport when boarding which is good news for the many Americans suffering from long passport processing times .

These include cruises that fall under the guidelines of an international agreement referred to as the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative and which start and end at the same U.S. port (known as a closed-loop itinerary). The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative dictates where you can and cannot sail without a passport, but most Western Hemisphere destinations are approved. 

A note on closed-loop itineraries 

Understand that when the government says “closed-loop itinerary” — they mean it! If you plan to take a cruise that visits foreign locales, it must start and end at the exact same U.S. port. 

If you leave Miami, you have to return to Miami. You cannot leave Miami, visit a few Caribbean islands, go through the Panama Canal and Mexico, and then hop off the ship in California. While, yes, you would have started and ended your journey in the United States, that’s still not good enough. You have to start and end at the exact same destination.

Examples of Cruise Destinations That Do Not Require a Passport

Cruises Without a Passport Needed

Photo: pixabay

The Caribbean

Of course, there are places in the Caribbean that you can go without any sort of special documentation whatsoever beyond what you would typically use to fly within the mainland United States. These destinations include:

  • Puerto Rico

However, thanks to the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, you can travel to many other islands throughout the Caribbean via a cruise. There’s no passport required. You will have to book a closed-loop sailing. However, that’s easy enough, as that’s the primary option you’ll find when booking most cruises anyway. 

Caribbean islands that you can visit during a closed-loop sailing without a passport include: 

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • The Bahamas
  • The British Virgin Islands
  • The Cayman Islands
  • The Dominican Republic
  • The Netherlands Antilles
  • St. Kitts and Nevis
  • St. Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Turks & Caicos

Click Here to See Commonly Booked Caribbean Cruises

Caribbean islands that you cannot visit during a closed-loop sailing without a passport include:

  • St. Martin 
  • Trinidad & Tobago 

Before booking your Caribbean cruise, thoroughly review the itinerary. You want to ensure that the ship will not stop at any of these islands. 

Otherwise, as you can see from the list above, most popular Caribbean destinations are fair game. Just ensure that you have the requisite documents in place of your passport, including a government-issued photo ID and an original or copy of your birth certificate. 

Whether you want to cruise along Mexico’s Caribbean side or the Pacific coast, you can do so without a passport, so long as your cruise starts and ends in the same port city in the United States. On these closed-loop itineraries, you only need to present a government ID and birth certificate (or a passport card).  

Click Here to See Commonly Booked Mexican Riviera Cruises

You won’t need a passport if you want to cruise up either side of Canada. This includes cruise itineraries that go to Alaska and that make stops in Canada along the way. 

This is also the one example of where you can take a cruise without a passport and without adhering to the closed-loop itinerary rule. You can technically take a cruise to Canada and not return to the same U.S. port, just as long as you don’t try to fly anywhere. The amicable relationship between Canada and the U.S. means you can cross Canada-U.S. borders via sea or land (not air) without a passport, if you have other valid identification, such as a NEXUS card or FAST card. 

That said, to be honest, gathering up other valid types of identification might be more troublesome than just getting a passport. For the most convenience possible, consider getting a passport if you don’t want to book a closed-loop itinerary cruise to Canada. 

Otherwise, on closed-loop itineraries that travel to Canada, you only need to present a government ID and birth certificate (or a passport card).  

Click Here to See Commonly Booked Canada & New England Cruises

Don’t forget about Hawaii! When most travelers think of cruises in sunny, sandy locales, they think of the Caribbean or South Pacific. However, Hawaii is right there, and since it’s a U.S. state, there’s no worry about passports.

You can choose to either fly out to Hawaii and take an inter-island cruise, or you can take a cruise all the way from California to Hawaii and back.

Click Here to See Commonly Booked Hawaii Cruises

Before cruising, read our Guide to Bringing Food, Alcohol, Water, & Snacks on a Cruise Ship as well as our guide on the Best Credit Cards for Cruises .

What Documentation Do You Need for a Cruise if You Don’t Have a Passport? 

According to the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative, when traveling on a closed-loop cruise without a passport, other valid documentation that you can present during cruise ship boarding includes:

  • A government-issued photo ID (for everyone over the age of 16)
  • PLUS an original or copy of your birth certificate from the Vital Records Department 
  • OR a consular report of birth abroad
  • OR a certificate of naturalization 

Note that the government-issued photo ID must show your photo, name, and date of birth. A driver’s license is valid; however, a social security card is not. 

Additionally, the birth certificate must be from the Vital Records Department, not the hospital, with the only exception being if the individual in question is so young that the Vital Records Department has not issued a birth certificate yet (so, basically a newborn). 

You can also get a passport card , which is like a lower-cost, limited version of a passport book (which is what a traditional passport is). This will work as valid identification for sea and land travel. However, it will not be accepted as a valid form of ID for air travel unless you’re flying domestically. 

Some U.S. citizens may also be able to use an “EDL” or an Enhanced Driver’s License, which can be used in place of a passport when re-entering the United States after traveling from Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean. However, at this time, EDLs are only available to citizens in certain states. 

Likewise, another potential option that’s valid on some cruises and in some destinations (though not all) is a Trusted Travel card. Trusted Traveler cards include Nexus, SENTRI, and FAST cards.

Still looking to get a passport? Learn How to Take Your Own Passport Photo at Home .

What happens if I don’t have the right documentation? 

Don’t have the right documentation to cruise, according to the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative and the U.S. Customs and Border Protection? Then don’t even bother trying to board the ship. You’ll be turned away at the cruise port.

Is it Worth Trying to Cruise Without a Passport? 

Let’s remember that just because you can do something doesn’t always mean that you should. For some travelers, trying to cruise without a passport just isn’t worth it.

For example, if you don’t have a copy of your birth certificate or any of the other accepted forms of documentation that you’ll need to cruise without a passport, you’ll still have to do a fair amount of paperwork and waiting to get that documentation. At that point, you could just get a passport.

Additionally, if you choose to go the passport card route, you’ll find it quite limiting. If you have any future plans of traveling internationally, paying the extra cost for a passport book is worth your time. 

There are also accidents and unforeseen emergencies to consider. While not common, it’s certainly not out of the realm of possibility for a cruise ship to need to make a sudden, unplanned stop at the nearest port. If that place happens to be somewhere that requires a passport, you may find yourself in a bad spot. 

Or, what if you’re in an accident or there’s an emergency at home? If you had a passport, you could just leave the cruise during its next stop and hop on a flight from the nearest airport. However, you always need a passport to fly internationally, so if you don’t have one, you’d be out of luck.

The same thing could happen if you accidentally don’t make it back to your ship in time for departure, following a day out at one of the itinerary’s destinations. While normally, you could meet back up with the ship on the next island over, if you had a passport, again, if you don’t, you can’t. 

All that said, though, if you don’t plan on traveling internationally at any other point, and you already have a copy of your birth certificate handy, then go ahead and book that cruise — just realize that there are some associated risks. 

Have a Passport? You Might Not Necessarily Be in the Clear

If you’ve given it some thought and plan to use your passport for an upcoming cruise, don’t just assume your trip will be all smooth sailing from here. 

Most destinations require that your passport be valid for six months after your departure date, and the same is true for most cruise lines. Before you book your cruise, ensure your current passport will still be valid six months from the cruise’s end date.

If you do have a passport, read our guide to the Best All-Inclusive Cruise Lines . Explore options for ocean and river cruises across the world.

You Should Always Check with Your Cruise Line

All of the above considered, you should always check with your cruise line regarding what documents you may need for an upcoming cruise. The cruise line will be able to inform you of its policies, as well as requirements that will apply to your specific itinerary. Most cruise lines, however, do greatly encourage travelers to bring a passport as their primary form of ID.

If your cruise begins and ends at the same port in the United States, stays within the Western Hemisphere, and does not visit certain Caribbean countries, then you can travel using other accepted documents.

According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection: “U.S. citizens on closed-loop cruises will be able to enter or depart the country with proof of citizenship, such as an Enhanced Driver’s License (EDL), a government-issued birth certificate (issued by the Vital Records Department in the state where he or she was born) or passport, and if 16 or older, a government-issued driver’s license, picture ID, denoting photo, name, and date of birth.”

If your cruise itinerary does not necessitate a passport, you must show other valid documentation. If your cruise itinerary does require a passport, and you don’t have one, you will be turned away from the ship and not allowed to board.

Caribbean countries that you cannot cruise to unless you have a passport include Barbados, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Martinique, St. Barts, and Trinidad & Tobago.

No, in most cases, you will not need to go through customs every time you leave a cruise ship. The cruise line will record your information upon boarding and then will provide that information to the destinations you visit on your behalf, so you don’t have to spend hours standing in long customs lines every time you want to disembark for a shore excursion.

Editorial Disclosure:   Opinions expressed here are the author’s alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, hotel, airline, or other entity. This content has not been reviewed, approved, or otherwise endorsed by any of the entities included within the post.  

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By Holly Riddle

Holly Riddle is a freelance travel, food, and lifestyle journalist who also dabbles in ghostwriting and fiction. Her work appears in publications ranging from Global Traveler to Golf Magazine, Mashed to Forbes, and Bloomberg. When she’s not writing, you can find her exploring the mountains near her home in the Adirondacks. Her favorite travel destinations include Chicago and New Orleans.

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On These Cruises, You Don’t Need a Passport

There are plenty of wonderful sailings you can take that don’t require a passport, including to foreign countries..

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Aerial image of Bermuda shoreline flanked by water

Sail to Bermuda on a closed-loop cruise from the East Coast and a passport isn’t mandatory.

Courtesy of Unsplash

If you get the urge to cruise and your passport has expired , or you have made a last-minute decision to take the kids and they don’t have passports , you may be wondering, do I need a passport to go on a cruise? In select destinations, you do not need a passport to go on a cruise. Whether you should cruise without a passport is another matter (there are some risks that we’ll get into below).

To cruise without a passport, you need to stay in the Western Hemisphere and sail from the United States on a “closed-loop” itinerary , which means you leave from and come back to the same U.S. port. The rules for sea travel were established under the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative . Cruises to the Caribbean, Bahamas, Alaska, Canada, New England, Mexico, Bermuda, and Hawai‘i all fit these criteria.

Keep in mind the “closed-loop” bit. If your ship is not returning to the same port—for instance, if you are eyeing a one-way Panama Canal sailing from Los Angeles to Miami—you do need a passport. You will also be limited on some Caribbean itineraries, as select islands such as St. Bart’s and Martinique do require a passport, which means your cruise line will require a passport before you board the ship.

If there is a passport requirement, each person needs to have one, including infants and toddlers.

All cruises everywhere else in the world that sail in destinations outside the United States require a passport.

What I.D. you’ll need instead of a passport

If you are on a closed-loop cruise that begins and ends in the U.S. and visits Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean, all you need to do is prove you are a U.S. citizen , and this applies to everyone in your party. Options here, in lieu of a passport, include an Enhanced Driver’s License , which is a state-issued driver’s license that provides proof of U.S. citizenship (currently available only to residents of Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Vermont, and Washington); a government-issued birth certificate; or an official Certificate of Naturalization . Note that the birth certificate can’t be the cute one with the baby’s footprints issued by the hospital; it needs to be issued by the Vital Records Department in the state where the child was born.

If you are age 16 and up, and without a passport, you will also need to present a photo I.D. such as a state-issued I.D. or driver’s license. The photo I.D. must include your photo, name, and date of birth.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) provides a detailed description of the requirements . If you have any questions, check with your travel agent or cruise line. You don’t want to be turned away at the pier for lack of proper identification.

The risks of not bringing a passport on an international sailing

Even on closed-loop sailings in North America, cruise lines typically strongly recommend that you have a passport. The reason: While you’re in a Caribbean country, Canada, or Mexico, you could encounter issues if for any reason you need to cut your trip short and fly home. Passports are required to fly back to the U.S.

This point should be top-of-mind especially because of COVID-19 and any other medical emergency that would require the trip to be altered or a medical evacuation. You’ll also be glad you have a passport if you encounter other unforeseen circumstances such as a family emergency or a sailing cut short due to bad weather or technical issues.

If you don’t have a passport, you will also run into problems should you miss boarding your ship at the correct time and need to fly home or to the next port of call.

Passport cards, a form of government I.D. that is cheaper than a passport book, can get you on the ship but are valid for entering the USA by land and sea only. They don’t work for air travel.

Where you can cruise without a passport

An UnCruise Adventures ship in Neka Bay, Alaska

You can cruise Alaska either on closed-loop sailings from Seattle that stop in Canada along the way, or fly to Alaska and take a cruise that remains within the state.

Courtesy of UnCruise Adventures

See a glacier calve, spot whales, and explore wilderness towns on “closed-loop” sailings from Seattle on lines such as Norwegian Cruise Line , Celebrity Cruises , Holland America Line , and Princess . The sailings visit Canada for a day, but no passport is required.

For small-ship fans, other options include sailings that do not leave Alaska, such as those of UnCruise Adventures , Lindblad Expeditions , and Alaska Native–owned Alaskan Dream Cruises .

The beach with palm trees at Royal Caribbean's CocoCay

Kick back on the beach at Royal Caribbean’s CocoCay in the Bahamas.

Photo by Peter Hansen/Unsplash

Quick three- to five-day hops to the Bahamas bring you to white-sand beaches and cruise lines’ private islands at an affordable price, with no passport required. If you are on a longer cruise that visits other Caribbean islands, you’ll want to check with your cruise line about any passport requirements.

Among the many options are Disney Cruise Line sailings from Port Canaveral (near Orlando) that visit Disney’s private island Castaway Cay and Royal Caribbean sailings from Fort Lauderdale, Port Canaveral, and Miami that head to the extravagant waterpark at the line’s private island CocoCay. Virgin Voyages’ ships are limited to age 18 and up and bring you to Virgin’s classy Beach Club at Bimini. For a fancy small ship, check out sailings on the 298-passenger Evrima , the first yacht from the Ritz-Carlton Yacht Collection, sailing to the Bahamas from Fort Lauderdale.

Closed-loop cruises from New York City, Boston, Baltimore, and Port Canaveral from lines such as MSC Cruises , Norwegian , Celebrity , and Royal Caribbean head to the famous pink-sand beaches and golf courses of Bermuda. In October, Disney does sailings from New York that add the bonus of Halloween activities with special spooky movies and “ghoulish treats” for passengers of all ages. Other lines sailing to Bermuda on closed-loop itineraries include the foodie-focused upscale brand Oceania Cruises , also from New York.

Aerial view of a remote stretch of beach and water in Vieques, Puerto Rico

Caribbean cruises to the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico are a safe bet for those who don’t have a passport.

Photo by Ethan Jameson/Unsplash

Year-round Caribbean cruises are ideal vacations for sun-seekers looking for blue skies, powdery sand, and time spent relaxing under swaying palm trees. Round-trip itineraries that don’t require a passport embark from ports that include Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and Tampa in Florida; Mobile, Alabama; New Orleans; and Galveston, Texas, on all the big ship lines, including Royal Caribbean’s mega-ships , the largest in the world.

You won’t run into any passport requirements on tried-and-true routes from U.S. ports such as those that visit Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands—St. Thomas, St. Croix, and St. John—which are all part of the United States. You can also fly in to embark on cruises from these destinations.

However, when looking at small ships and larger ships on more expansive routes, keep in mind some islands—including Martinique, Guadeloupe, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, and St. Bart’s—do require a passport.

A lighthouse on rugged coastline in Maine

Head up the Eastern seaboard for dramatic shoreline views.

Photo by Julie Haider/Unsplash

New England and Canada

If your calling card is lobsters, rugged coastline, whale-spotting, colonial history, or fall colors, all are accessible on itineraries that sail round-trip from Boston, New York, and Bayonne, New Jersey, on lines that include Celebrity , Norwegian , and Royal Caribbean .

On one-way sailings, such as between Montreal and Boston on Holland America Line , you will need a passport to fly to or from Canada.

Aerial view of soaring green mountains along the coast in Kaua‘i

Get a view of Kaua‘i’s stunning landscapes from the vantage point of the sea on any number of Hawai‘i cruises.

Photo by Braden Jarvis/Unsplash

There are two ways to cruise to the volcanoes, tropical forests, whales, and surfing beaches of Hawai‘i without a passport. One is on a cruise where you fly in and spend your entire vacation in and around the islands. The other is a long slog, closed-loop sailing from a California port or Seattle, with a stop in Ensenada, Mexico, and several days at sea getting to and from Hawai‘i.

The only big ship line with the fly-in option is Norwegian Cruise Line’s 2,186-passenger Pride of America , which is U.S.-flagged, a requirement for operating to and from a U.S. port without stopping in another country. (Foreign-flagged lines are not allowed to sail between U.S. ports without visiting another country under the Jones Act.) You can do a week on the ship from Honolulu and visit five Hawaiian Islands.

For a one-week small ship experience, book UnCruise Adventures , from Moloka‘i to the Big Island, stopping on the island of Lāna‘i and Maui. If cruising from California, with most sailings 14 nights or longer, your choices expand to such lines as Holland America , Celebrity , Viking Cruises , and Seabourn .

Resorts line the coastline of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

Sail down to Cabo from California.

Photo by Victor Hughes/Unsplash

No passport is required on western Caribbean closed-loop itineraries from the United States, offered by all the major cruise lines from Florida ports, New Orleans, Galveston, and elsewhere to places such as Cozumel, Costa Maya, and Progresso. Belize and Honduras, which are sometimes included on these itineraries, also waive their passport requirements for cruise ship passengers.

You can also cruise to the Mexican Riviera—destinations such as Cabo San Lucas, Puerto Vallarta, and Mazatlán—without a passport. These round-trip sailings typically embark from Los Angles, Long Beach, San Diego, and San Francisco. If your cruise also visits other countries, you may be required to have a passport on hand—usually the cruise lines will ask to see it but you likely won’t need it on shore. Lines doing the sailings include Princess , Holland America , Disney , Norwegian , Celebrity, and Royal Caribbean .

Courtesy of Kessler Collection

You don't have to wait for a passport to travel: What to know about closed-loop cruises

cruises from baltimore no passport

When Chanel Sims graduated college, her mom rewarded her achievement by treating her daughter to a trip with Carnival Cruise Line .

But the July 2022 sailing – shortly after her graduation in May – didn’t leave Sims much time to get a key travel document: her passport.

Sims, now 24, had never gotten one. She tried once before to study abroad but was dissuaded by long wait times , and traveling internationally for fun wasn’t on her radar.

“I was a broke college student. I wasn’t going anywhere,” said Sims, who lives in Los Angeles and works for a life insurance agency.

Luckily for her, there was an alternative: She sailed with her family from Miami to the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos and back with just her photo ID and birth certificate.

In many cases, travelers can sail without a passport on round-trip voyages from the U.S. Here’s what to know.

What is a closed-loop cruise?

Closed-loop cruises are those that start and end at the same U.S. port and travel within the Western Hemisphere.

U.S. citizens booked on those sailings can leave and enter the country with proof of citizenship such as a birth certificate and – if 16 or older – a government-issued photo ID, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection .

They can also use an enhanced driver’s license , which denotes both proofs of identity and citizenship, though those are available only in Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Vermont and Washington for now. Travelers can reenter the country from Canada, the Caribbean and Mexico with an EDL, but the documents are valid for border crossings only by sea or land.

Travelers under 16 can show an “original, notarized or certified copy of his or her birth certificate, a Consular Report of Birth Abroad issued by Department of State, (DOS) and/or Certificate of Naturalization issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS),” according to Customs and Border Protection’s website.

Cruise lines may require you to have a passport anyway, however.

Regent Seven Seas Cruises, for example, requires passports for all voyages no matter the ports of call or countries visited, and destinations may call for them as well.

Carnival, which Sims sailed with, allows U.S. citizens to sail without a passport on qualifying cruises but "highly recommends that all guests travel with a passport valid for at least six months beyond completion of travel," according to its website .

How do I know if I can sail without a passport?

Cruise lines typically provide guidance for travelers on the requirements of their sailing, according to Drew Daly, senior vice president and general manager of travel agency franchise Dream Vacations. A travel adviser can also help fill in any blanks.

Cruising without a passport can be risky, though. The State Department encourages having one "in case of an emergency, such as an unexpected medical air evacuation or the ship docking at an alternate port," according to its website .

If travelers get stuck at a port of call, there will be “a lot of red tape you have to get through” to make it home without one, Daly said.

In those cases, they should contact the U.S. Embassy and local immigration authorities, he said. Daly also recommended taking a photo of your government IDs, which can be helpful backups when dealing with officials.

A travel adviser can hold travelers’ hands through the process, though Daly noted “it’s not something that happens a lot.”

Sims, for her part, was able to easily get off the ship at ports like Nassau with just her Sail & Sign card, she said, which acts as both a room key and means of charging items to your onboard account. After showing her birth certificate and photo ID during the initial boarding process, she kept them in a suitcase.

There are other advantages to having a passport. For instance, the document gives travelers who don't board their cruise in time more flexibility to meet the ship at its next stop. “You can’t fly to Mexico without a passport,” Daly said.

Routine processing of passports currently takes between 10 and 13 weeks, and seven to nine weeks for expedited service, according to the State Department . But most travelers who book with Dream Vacations plan their cruises at least six months out, according to Daly, which should give them plenty of time to get one: “So, we still highly encourage that.”

Nathan Diller is a consumer travel reporter for USA TODAY based in Nashville. You can reach him at [email protected] .

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Cruises Without Passport: Planning Your Closed Loop Cruise

Imagine embarking on a fantastic voyage where you can discover new places, savor delicious cuisine, and enjoy thrilling activities, all without worrying about passport hassles. Whether you're a first-time cruiser or a seasoned traveler, we've got all the information you need.

In this blog, we'll uncover the magic of passport-free cruising, where you can explore enchanting destinations close to home. We'll also delve into the ins and outs of boarding a cruise ship without a passport so you can plan your next vacation with confidence.

Closed-Loop Cruises

What is Closed Loop Cruising?

Closed-loop cruising, or roundtrip cruising is a type of cruise where your journey starts and ends at the same port, making it a convenient choice for travelers looking to cruise without a passport. You can depart from major cruise cities like Miami, Los Angeles, or New York City. Exploring various destinations throughout the cruise. The key differentiator is returning to your starting point, saving you the trouble of bringing passports, one-way flights, and complex travel plans. 

Can I Cruise Without a Passport?

Yes, you can cruise without a passport with closed-loop cruises, which start and end at the same port. On closed-loop cruises, you can use a passport card, enhanced driver's license, or other accepted forms of identification for your journey. While a passport is often the safest and most versatile travel document, it's possible to enjoy a cruise without one if you plan accordingly and stick to closed-loop itineraries.

The Benefits and Limitations of Traveling Without a Passport

Benefit: Convenience

Cruises without a passport can be convenient for travelers on closed-loop itineraries, starting and ending at the same U.S. port. If you don’t have a valid passport, closed-loop cruises allow you to cruise with other government-issued IDs, saving you the stress of acquiring a valid passport. It's particularly advantageous for domestic travelers and those who want to avoid the potential hassles of passport-related issues during their cruise. However, travelers should check their specific cruise line's policies and be aware that if they plan to visit foreign ports during the cruise, a passport may still be required. Having a passport is generally recommended for international travel and emergencies.

Limitation: Emergencies

In some emergency situations, your cruise may have to stop in a foreign port. Without a passport, this can be a serious problem as you may need a passport to be able to return home. This could mean having to apply for a passport and receive it while out of the country, which can be very complicated.

Limitation: Inconsistent Entry Requirements and Rules

Each cruise line has its own rules and regulations for closed-loop cruises. If you don't know the specific rules for the cruise you are taking, it can cause complications on your cruise with what ports you're allowed to visit. Depending on your cruise, you may not be allowed to visit some of the ports without a passport due to the risk of an emergency where you do not have the proper legal documents. Be sure to look into your specific cruise before booking to make sure you know what the specifications are for your trip.

How to Go on a Closed Loop Cruise

Necessary Documents and Legal Information

For U.S. citizens, one of the most significant legal considerations is the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI). Under WHTI, U.S. citizens have the privilege of traveling on closed-loop cruises to destinations like the Caribbean, Mexico, and Canada with proof of citizenship, such as a birth certificate and a government-issued photo ID, instead of a passport.

This flexibility can be a convenient option for travelers, as it simplifies the documentation process and may save both time and money.  Double-check the specific requirements for your chosen cruise destination, as regulations can vary depending on the itinerary. Being well-prepared with the right documents ensures you can set sail on your closed-loop cruise adventure with confidence and peace of mind.

Travel Insurance Requirements/Recommendations

While closed-loop cruises may allow U.S. citizens to travel with proof of citizenship like a birth certificate and a government-issued photo ID, having comprehensive travel insurance is highly recommended, as it provides essential coverage for unforeseen events.

Travel insurance safeguards you against disruptions such as trip cancellations or delays due to unexpected circumstances like severe weather or medical emergencies, ensuring you don't bear the financial burden. Additionally, travel insurance is indispensable for covering unexpected medical expenses while at sea or in foreign ports, offering peace of mind in case of illness, injury, or emergency evacuations. In essence, it's your safety net, ensuring your cruise remains a memorable and worry-free experience, even when traveling without a passport.

TravelGuard has great travel insurance offerings. With many different insurance plans, they are flexible to fit the plan for your cruise vacation and help with any mishaps or emergencies that may occur along the way.

What to Bring on a Cruise if You Don’t Have a Passport?

When cruising without a passport, be sure to bring other forms of government-issued identification, as required by your cruise line. Remember your travel insurance, your cruise reservation documents, and any shore excursion details. In addition to your travel documents, we recommend bringing comfortable clothing, swimwear, toiletries, and any necessary medications. 

Cruise Lines Offering Closed-Loop Cruises

Various cruise lines allow travel without a passport. Below is a list of some of the most popular cruise lines that offer passport-free cruising.

Royal Caribbean

Royal Caribbean offers closed-loop cruises to places like Mexico, Canada, and the US. Royal Caribbean boasts world-class dining, incredible entertainment, and family friendly amenities. Their entertainment facilities include theatre productions, live ice skating performances, water shows, casinos, nightclubs, and music bars. To entertain the kids, they have bumper cars, kids clubs, waterslides, and much more.

Carnival Cruise Line

Carnival Cruise Line offers many different closed-loop cruises you can take without a passport. Carnival Cruises offers passport-free sailing to Alaska, The Bahamas, Bermuda, Cozumel, New England, Canada, The Caribbean, Hawaii, and Baja, Mexico. Carnival Cruise Line is known for its lively, fun-filled atmosphere, appealing to a wide demographic with its affordable, family-friendly vacations. It offers a plethora of onboard activities ranging from water slides and pools to diverse dining options and vibrant nightlife, making it popular for those seeking an energetic and entertaining cruise experience.

Celebrity Cruises

Celebrity Cruises has many closed-loop cruise vacation options available and can be a great option when looking for passport-free cruises.Celebrity Cruises offers closed-loop cruises to the Mexican Riviera to many amazing locations like the Baja desert.

Celebrity Cruises emphasizes a modern luxury experience, combining sophisticated design, contemporary décor, and a focus on culinary excellence. The ships are elegantly designed with modern amenities and artistic touches. The line provides a diverse range of onboard entertainment options, including Broadway-style shows, live music, educational talks, cooking classes, wine tastings, and wellness programs. Known for their high level of customer service, Celebrity Cruises staff are attentive and provide personalized service to ensure a memorable experience for guests.

Celebrity Cruises is perfect for passport-free cruising, find the cruise you're looking for today!

Norwegian Cruise Line

Norwegian Cruise Line offers great passport-free cruising. Voted to be the Best Hawaii Cruise Itinerary, the Pride of America sails round-trip from Honolulu to Big Island, Kauai, Maui, and Oahu.  Norwegian Cruise Line offers guests flexibility and freedom in dining times, seating arrangements, and attire, along with a wide range of entertainment options, including Broadway shows and water parks. The line also features a variety of cabin types, from solo traveller studios to luxurious suites, catering to diverse traveller needs.

Cruise Destinations to Explore Without a Passport

Below is a list of some of the locations you can visit on a closed-loop cruise. 

Celebrity Cruises operates Caribbean cruises departing from Florida, most often out of Fort Lauderdale to places like St. Maarten, Barbados, St. Lucia, and other Caribbean islands. One of Celebrity's most innovative ships is the Celebrity Edge , which travels from Fort Lauderdale to the Bahamas and the Caribbean.

Mexican Riviera

Celebrity Cruises regularly offers closed-loop cruises from California ports like Long Beach to the Mexican Riviera destinations, including Cabo San Lucas and the Baja desert. The Mexican Riviera, a stunning stretch along Mexico's Pacific Coast, is famous for its diverse and scenic destinations. Cabo San Lucas is renowned for its beautiful beaches, water sports, and vibrant nightlife. The nearby Baja desert adds a contrasting landscape, offering unique adventures like desert safaris and exploration of its distinct flora and fauna, complementing the seaside allure of the Riviera.

Norwegian Cruise Line offers passport-free cruises within the Hawaiian islands. The Hawaiian Islands are a paradise of diverse landscapes and cultures, with Honolulu on Oahu famed for its vibrant city life and iconic Waikiki Beach, while the Big Island is known for its volcanic landscapes and diverse ecosystems. Kauai, the "Garden Isle," mesmerizes with its lush greenery and dramatic cliffs, Maui is celebrated for its luxury resorts and Humpback whale watching, and Oahu blends history with natural beauty, home to the historic Pearl Harbor and the famed North Shore surfing beaches.

There are great cruising opportunities from Cape Liberty to Bermuda. You can take a  trip as short as 3 days and 2 nights on board to Bermuda, an idyllic island in the North Atlantic. Bermuda is renowned for its unique pink-sand beaches and a rich maritime history reflected in its well-preserved colonial architecture and the historic town of St. George. Its crystal-clear blue waters, extensive coral reef system, and numerous shipwrecks make it a premier destination for snorkeling, diving, and exploring the vibrant marine life.

Can I Take a Royal Caribbean Cruise Without a Passport?

Yes, you can often take a Royal Caribbean cruise without a passport if you are a U.S. citizen. Royal Caribbean, like many other cruise lines, offers closed-loop cruises that start and end at the same U.S. port while visiting specific nearby countries.

Note that entry requirements and policies can change, so we recommend verifying the specific documentation requirements with Royal Caribbean or consulting with your travel agent before booking your cruise.

Can I Go on a Cruise to the Bahamas Without a Passport?

Yes, you can cruise to the Bahamas without a passport, as long as your voyage starts and ends at the same U.S. port with a Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI) compliant document. However, it's advisable to check the specific policies of your cruise line, as some might require a passport, regardless. Remember that if an emergency arises that requires you to fly back to the U.S., not having a passport will cause complications. Traveling with a valid passport is always recommended for convenience and unexpected situations. 

Explore the possibility of cruising to the Bahamas without a passport at JustCruises.com . Your tropical escape may be closer than you think!

Experience Cruises Without a Passport Today

Cruising without a passport opens up a world of possibilities. From the luxury of major cruise lines to the serene landscapes of your destination, every travel enthusiast can find something that fits their cruising needs. Remember to explore various cruise line options, understand the legalities, pack the required documents, and ensure you have suitable travel insurance.

The adventures in places like the Caribbean Sea and Glacier Bay are waiting for you. The question is, are you ready to plunge into a journey, even without a passport in hand? The world of no-passport cruises is waiting to be explored! Book a closed-loop cruise with Royal Caribbean and have the time of your life, passport-free.

Expert Author: Bruce Parkinson

Bruce has written about the travel industry for over three decades, focusing on ocean and river cruising in recent years. Currently Senior Editor for TravelPulse Canada, Bruce is also a travel communications consultant and contributor to the popular CruiseRadio.net.

Protect Your Trip »

Here's when you need (and don't need) a passport to cruise.

It's the type of sailing – closed-loop or open-loop – that largely determines whether or not you need a passport to cruise.

Do You Need a Passport for a Cruise?

Passports on a map showing cruise lanes.

Getty Images

A passport isn't always required for cruising.

To determine whether or not you need a passport to cruise, you first need to figure out if the itinerary is closed-loop or open-loop (also known as open-jaw).

Closed-loop cruise: A closed-loop cruise typically doesn't require a passport since it begins and ends in the same U.S. port (though there are some exceptions to this rule).

Example: Royal Caribbean International 's seven-night Western Caribbean & Perfect Day cruise stops in several countries – the Bahamas, Jamaica, Haiti and Grand Cayman – but the itinerary is considered closed-loop because it starts and ends in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Open-loop cruise: An open-loop cruise begins in one U.S. port and ends in a different U.S. port.

Example: Carnival Cruise Line 's 16-day Panama Canal from Seattle itinerary is not considered closed-loop because it departs from Seattle and completes its journey in New Orleans.

All of the above regulations have been determined by the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative: a plan by the departments of State and Homeland Security that determines which documents are acceptable for proving identity and citizenship when entering the United States.

Where to cruise without a passport

There are several destinations where you can cruise without a passport on a closed-loop sailing. They include the following:

  • The Bahamas

When looking at cruises to these locations, be mindful of the home ports. The Bahamas, Mexico, Bermuda, the Caribbean and Canada are all foreign ports, which means they only qualify for the passport exception if they are a stop along your cruise itinerary . If the cruise originates in any of these countries, it is likely you will need a passport.

Since Alaska, Hawaii and New England are all U.S. destinations, any closed-loop routes departing from these locations will not require a passport. However, keep in mind that it can be hard to find closed-loop cruises originating in Hawaii or Alaska.

To find closed-loop itineraries for a Hawaiian voyage or Alaskan cruise , try searching for sailings departing from major cities on the West Coast, like Seattle or Los Angeles . By contrast, quite a few closed-loop cruises leave from New England ports, but they are often marketed as Canadian cruises.

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When you need a passport for closed-loop cruises

Some cruise itineraries include foreign ports that require a passport for disembarkation. This is most commonly an issue for travelers on a closed-loop Caribbean cruise. Barbados , Guadeloupe , Haiti, Martinique , St. Barts , and Trinidad and Tobago all require U.S. citizens to present a valid passport to disembark and enter the country, despite WHTI regulations not requiring a passport for these destinations. Labadee, Royal Caribbean's private island , is an exception and does not require a passport despite its location in Haiti.

If your itinerary includes a country requiring a U.S. passport, your cruise line will require you to have the passport at check-in. Note that your passport must not expire within six months of your arrival in a foreign country or else it won't be considered valid for international travel.

Read: The Easiest Way to Renew Your Passport

Acceptable forms of ID

All travelers – U.S. citizens and foreign nationals alike – must present documents that show identity and citizenship when entering the United States. A U.S. passport can show both. If you don't have one or don't want to bring one, be aware that you may need to present more than one document.

U.S. citizens 16 and older

If you're a U.S. citizen age 16 or older sailing on a closed-loop cruise without your passport, you will need a government-issued photo ID like a driver's license. In addition, you must present a document that proves your U.S. citizenship. These include:

  • Passport card
  • State-issued enhanced driver's license (EDL)
  • Government-issued birth certificate
  • Trusted Traveler Program card (NEXUS, SENTRI or FAST)
  • American Indian Card (Form I-872) or Enhanced Tribal ID Card

The Trusted Traveler Programs are risk-based programs to facilitate the entry of travelers who have been vetted and preapproved. Most of these programs will provide you with a machine-readable card that allows you to pass through border checkpoints quickly. Keep in mind, some of these IDs are only available to travelers 16 and older.

Read: TSA Precheck vs. Global Entry

U.S. citizens younger than 16

U.S. citizens younger than 16 are only required to present proof of citizenship, such as one of the following documents:

  • Original, notarized or certified copy of their government-issued birth certificate
  • Consular Report of Birth Abroad issued by U.S. Department of State
  • Certificate of Naturalization issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

Read: How to Get a Passport for Kids

Non-U.S. citizens

If you are a lawful permanent resident (or LPR) of the United States, you are required to present a permanent resident card or other valid evidence of permanent residence status.

Non-U.S. citizens, with the exception of Canadians and Mexicans, are not subject to passport exceptions, so a valid passport will need to be provided. Canadian citizens can present a valid passport, Enhanced Driver's License or Trusted Traveler Program card. Mexican citizens must present a passport with a visa or a Border Crossing Card.

Unacceptable forms of ID

While most common forms of identification are accepted, there are a few exceptions. U.S. military identification cards and U.S. Merchant Mariner documents are valid forms of identification, but only when traveling on official orders or in conjunction with official maritime business, so it is unlikely they will be accepted when traveling on a cruise.

Here are some other documents that will not be accepted as proof of citizenship:

  • Voter registration cards
  • Social Security cards
  • Baptismal papers
  • Hospital certificates of birth (for anyone older than a newborn)

It is important to note that many of the permitted forms of identification, such as a passport card or EDL, are only accepted at land and sea border crossings. Unforeseen circumstances, such as a medical air evacuation, may cause you to return to the U.S. by air travel. In this case, these documents won't be accepted when you try to reenter at the border crossing.

To avoid extra delays in your return to the U.S. following unforeseen travel complications, the Department of State recommends that everyone taking a cruise from the United States carry a valid passport book in case of emergency.

Why Trust U.S. News Travel

Erin Vasta has traveled extensively to international destinations, gaining a deep knowledge of travel regulations in the process. Her expertise in this area has saved her family and friends from unnecessary travel delays and ensured stress-free trips through border security in nearly 15 countries. To write this article, Vasta used her international travel experience and research skills.

You might also be interested in:

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5 Night Cruise to Bermuda

  • You like lots of fun activities on a big ship with fewer people
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9 Night Cruise to Bermuda

9 night cruise to canada & new england, 8 night cruise to the bahamas, 8 night cruise to the southern caribbean, 11 night cruise to canada & new england.

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7 Night Cruise to the Bahamas

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7 Night Cruise to Bermuda

14 night cruise to the panama canal & central america, 14 night cruise to the caribbean, 12 night cruise to the southern caribbean, travelers are discussing:.

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Where To Cruise Without A Passport

cruises from baltimore no passport

If you are a United States citizen without a passport and you have a vacation coming up, don’t worry! Many regular cruisers journey to other countries without ever having to use a passport. There are multiple options available for this.

One of the most popular passport-free cruise options is taking a closed-loop cruise. Closed-loop cruises are round-trip journeys that depart from and return to the same port in the United States, and the only required documents are a driver’s license or government-issued Identity Document and a birth certificate.

While the choices for closed-loop cruises are limited, there are still many amazing destinations to choose from. Keep reading for our list of the best cruise destinations to visit without a passport.

Keep in mind that while these cruises may not require a passport, some ports (like Guadeloupe and Martinique) do not allow cruisers to enter their country without a valid passport. It’s recommended you research the ports of call thoroughly to determine whether you will need a passport on your cruise. Alternatively, you can stay onboard the ship instead of joining shore excursions.

Passport-free Destinations

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Alaskan cruises are ideal for anyone looking to surround themselves with nature and spend some time in the great outdoors. From sparkling glaciers to breathtaking mountain views, there’s no shortage of stunning photo opportunities. Guests can also try their hand at wildlife spotting, including moose, bald eagles, and whales. There are many fun activities, like cuddling up to some sled dog puppies, going on a train ride, or enjoying fresh crab and salmon while out on shore excursions.

The only ports that provide closed-loop voyages to Alaska are San Francisco, Seattle, and Los Angeles. You will need a valid passport for entry into Canada if you depart from other ports like Victoria or Vancouver. The same can be said for one-way cruises from Vancouver to Alaska, or vice versa.

The Bahamas

800px Clifton Pier%2C Bahamas panoramio

Many of the cruises to the Bahamas are short and affordable and sail from Florida. These cruises include everything from water sports and casinos to lovely beaches and spending time at the Atlantis resort.

There are a number of ports in the Gulf Coast and East Coast that offer round-trip cruises in the Bahamas, including Port Everglades in Fort Lauderdale, Galveston, Cape Liberty in Bayonne, Baltimore, Jacksonville, Manhattan in New York, Norfolk, Miami, and Port Canaveral in Orlando.

800px Bermuda %28UK%29 image number 235 view from bluff looking at Horseshoe Bay beach

If you’re looking for a location you can easily explore in a short amount of time, while the ship is in port, the Bahamas is an ideal passport-free cruise option. The island is fairly small, and many of the itineraries include overnight stays. This means you’ll have enough time to walk around town, stop at local restaurants, and explore the nightlife scene.

Passengers based in the East Coast can set sail from several ports, including Boston, Manhattan in New York, Cape Liberty in Bayonne, and Baltimore. Now and then there are also cruise lines that depart from Charleston, Norfolk, Miami, and Port Canaveral in Orlando.

The Caribbean

800px AIDluna Caribbean Sunset

Known for its excellent beaches, sunbathing spots, shopping opportunities, rich heritage, and variety of adventurous activities, the Caribbean is one of the most popular options for passengers without passports. It has various departure ports and itinerary options for closed-loop cruises and includes everything from swimming under waterfalls to ziplining.

There are three sub-regions within the Caribbean, namely:

Eastern Caribbean

  • U.S. Virgin Islands
  • British Virgin Islands
  • French West Indies
  • Dominican Republic

Southern Caribbean

  • ABC Islands
  • St. Vincent

Western Caribbean

There is a wide variety of departure ports in the U.S., including Port Everglades in Fort Lauderdale, Baltimore, Cape Liberty in Bayonne, Manhattan in New York, Charleston, Port, Canaveral in Orlando, Galveston, Miami, New Orleans, and Tampa. There are also some occasional once-off, closed-loop Caribbean cruises from Norfolk and Los Angeles.

New England and Canada

800px A small island off the coast of East Sooke Regional Park%2C British Columbia%2C Canada 22

If you’re looking for the perfect cruise to take during the autumn months, you’d be delighted by New England and Canada cruises. These voyages are known for their friendly locals, rich maritime history, and stunning views of changing leaves. Visitors can enjoy fresh lobster in Bar Harbor or spend some time at Peggy’s Cove in Nova Scotia.

The embarkation points that serve Canadian and New England cruises are Manhattan in New York, Cape Liberty in Bayonne, Baltimore, and Boston.

If you’re sailing on a one-way cruise to places like Quebec and Montreal in Canada, keep in mind that you will need a passport to conclude your journey unless you have Canadian citizenship.

800px Waikiki waikiki beach aerial photography 2

Hawaii forms part of America, making it an ideal location for an exotic passport-free getaway. Visitors can enjoy things like hula dancing, surfing, great food, volcanic vistas, and beaches with fascinating black sand. When going on a closed-loop cruise to Hawaii, passengers often need to fly to Honolulu first. While this won’t necessarily require a passport, the airfare can get expensive.

There are also some closed-loop cruises setting sail from the West Coast, but they include stops at foreign ports which require passwords, and a big chunk of the cruise is spent at sea.

The only cruise ships based in Hawaii are Pride of America (Norwegian Cruise Line), which offers round-trip cruises from Honolulu, and Safari Explorer (UnCruise Adventures), which offers cruises from the Big Island to Molokai and vice versa. Other ports with closed-loop itineraries include Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego.

800px

If you’re from the West Coast, Mexican Riviera voyages can be an excellent passport-free cruise option for you. Mexico offers a rich culture, fascinating heritage, delicious food, and exciting activities. It is also typically a more affordable vacation destination than Hawaii.

Cruises to Mexico most often depart from San Diego, Long Beach and San Pedro in Los Angeles, and San Francisco.

Puerto Rico

San Felipe del Morro view across bay

Located in the Caribbean, passengers with U.S. citizenship, or those who are legal permanent residents in the U.S., do not need passports to enter Puerto Rico. It is about a thousand miles southeast of Florida and includes some of the world’s best beaches. Passengers traveling to Puerto Rico on a cruise ship can enjoy a variety of activities, including hiking, water sports, or taking a kayak to the glowing waters of Mosquito Bay.

Royal Caribbean International, Celebrity Cruises, and Carnival Cruise line all offer cruises from the USA to Puerto Rico.

American Samoa

Vatia from the National Park of American Samoa

Another great destination for travelers without a passport is American Samoa. It is made up of several smaller islands and forms part of U.S. territory. Visitors typically enter through Honolulu in Hawaii, and it is an excellent cruise destination if you want to some breathtaking sights.

Holland America, Princess Cruises, and Celebrity cruises all offer itineraries to American Samoa.

Guam Sunset

The only requirements for U.S. citizens to enter the island of Guam are a valid ID document and/or proof of citizenship. It is one of the most populous Mariana Islands, making it a fun summer vacation destination. It has an excellent climate and world-renowned beaches (like Ypao Beach Park). It also has a rich history and cultural heritage, and visitors who enjoy snorkeling can stop by some of the sunken warships from World War I and II.

Holland America offers cruises to Guam.

Cruising Without A Passport FAQs

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Can I cruise to Europe without a passport?

At the moment, U.S. citizens need valid passports to travel to Europe. Note that in some cases, you may also need additional documentation when you arrive, like a visa. Visas can take many months to acquire, so be sure to schedule your visa appointments long before you plan to begin cruising.

Are there any Celebrity Cruises that don’t require a passport?

Celebrity Cruises offer passport-free sailings from Fort Lauderdale to Mexico, the Bahamas, Key West, Belize, Puerto Rico, and Grand Cayman. They also offer similar sailings from Seattle to Alaska, from Los Angeles to the Mexican Riviera, and from Cape Liberty to Bermuda.

Are there any Princess Cruises that don’t require a passport?

Princess Cruises provide passport-free sailings from San Francisco or Seattle to Alaska, from New York to Canada and New England, From Fort Lauderdale or New York to the Caribbean, and from Los Angeles or San Francisco to Mexico and Hawaii.

At what age do children need passports for travel?

Children traveling inside the U.S. do not need to present passports. However, for travel outside the U.S., all minors need passports, including infants.

When do I need to renew my passport?

In most cases, your passport needs to be valid for at least six months before you can travel. This means that you will need to get your new passport at least six months before your cruise date.

What does a new passport cost?

As of 2022, a new U.S. passport for an adult costs one hundred and thirty USD and is valid for air travel as well as traveling by land. Keep in mind that the prices may vary from year to year, so be sure to check prices on an official government site while you plan your cruise budget.

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Day 1: Baltimore, Maryland

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Baltimore Cruise Guide

Baltimore Cruise Guide > Cruises

Cruises from Baltimore

Welcome to our complete schedule of cruises from Baltimore, Maryland. There are cruises leaving year-round. See what's available in 2024 or 2025 .

Go straight to cruises out of Baltimore in January 2024 , February 2024 , March 2024 , April 2024 , May 2024 , June 2024 , July 2024 , August 2024 , September 2024 , October 2024 , November 2024 , December 2024 , January 2025 , February 2025 , March 2025 , April 2025 , May 2025 , June 2025 , July 2025 , August 2025 , September 2025 , October 2025 , November 2025 or December 2025 .

January 2024

January 6: 13-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean January 7: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises January 14: 14-day Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises January 19: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean January 27: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean January 28: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

February 2024

February 4: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises February 8: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean February 11: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises February 16: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean February 18: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises February 24: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean February 25: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises Valentine's Day cruises from Baltimore

March 3: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises March 7: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean March 10: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises March 15: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean March 17: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises March 23: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean March 24: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises March 31: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises

April 4: 8-night Florida & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean April 7: 8-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises April 12: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean April 15: 12-day Transatlantic cruise to Spain on Carnival Cruises April 20: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean April 21: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises April 28: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises

May 4: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 5: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises May 9: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 11: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 12: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises May 16: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 18: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 19: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises May 23: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 25: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean May 26: 14-day Greenland & Canada cruise on Carnival Cruises May 30: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean

June 8: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean June 9: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises June 13: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean June 16: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises June 22: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean June 23: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises June 27: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean June 30: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

July 6: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean July 7: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises July 11: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean July 14: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises July 20: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean July 21: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises July 25: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean July 28: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

August 2024

August 3: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean August 4: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises August 8: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean August 11: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises August 17: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean August 18: 14-day Greenland & Canada cruise on Carnival Cruises August 22: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean August 31: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean

September 2024

September 1: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises September 5: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean September 7: 11-night Canada & New England cruise on Norwegian September 8: 14-day Greenland & Canada cruise on Carnival Cruises September 14: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean September 19: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean September 22: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises September 28: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean September 29: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

October 2024

October 3: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean October 6: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises October 12: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean October 13: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises October 17: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean October 20: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises October 26: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean October 27: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises October 28: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises October 31: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean

November 2024

November 3: 14-day Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises November 6: 14-night East Coast Passage cruise on American Cruises November 9: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean November 9: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises November 10: 14-night East Coast Passage cruise on American Cruises November 17: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises November 21: 8-night Florida & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean November 24: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises November 29: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean Thanksgiving cruises from Baltimore

December 2024

December 1: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises December 7: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean December 8: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises December 15: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises December 19: 8-night Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean December 22: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises December 27: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean December 29: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises Christmas cruises from Baltimore New Year cruises from Baltimore

January 2025

January 5: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises January 12: 14-day Panama Canal & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises January 16: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean January 24: 8-night Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean

February 2025

February 1: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean February 2: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises February 9: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises February 13: 8-night Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean February 16: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises February 21: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean February 23: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises Valentine's Day cruises from Baltimore

March 1: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean March 2: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises March 9: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises March 13: 8-night Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean March 16: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises March 21: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean March 23: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises March 29: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean March 30: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

April 6: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises April 10: 8-night Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean April 13: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises April 18: 8-night Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean April 20: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises April 26: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean April 27: 7-day Bahamas & Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises

May 3: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 4: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises May 8: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean May 10: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 11: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises May 17: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises May 17: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean May 18: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises May 22: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean May 25: 14-day Greenland & Canada cruise on Carnival Cruises May 31: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean

June 2: 7-night Chesapeake Bay cruise on American Cruises June 5: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean June 8: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises June 14: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean June 15: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises June 19: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean June 22: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises June 28: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean June 29: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

July 3: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean July 6: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises July 12: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean July 13: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises July 17: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean July 20: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises July 26: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean July 27: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises July 31: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean

August 2025

August 3: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises August 9: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean August 10: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises August 14: 9-night Bermuda & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean August 17: 14-day Greenland & Canada cruise on Carnival Cruises August 23: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean August 28: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean August 31: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

September 2025

September 6: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean September 7: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises September 11: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean September 14: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises September 20: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean September 21: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises September 25: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean September 28: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

October 2025

October 4: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean October 5: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises October 9: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean October 12: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises October 18: 5-night Bermuda cruise on Royal Caribbean October 19: 7-day Bermuda cruise on Carnival Cruises October 23: 9-night Canada & New England cruise on Royal Caribbean October 26: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

November 2025

November 1: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean November 1: 14-night East Coast Passage cruise on American Cruises November 2: 14-day Caribbean cruise on Carnival Cruises November 5: 14-night East Coast Passage cruise on American Cruises November 7: 14-night East Coast Passage cruise on American Cruises November 13: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean November 16: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises November 23: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises November 29: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean November 30: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

December 2025

December 7: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises December 11: 8-night Southeast & Bahamas cruise on Royal Caribbean December 14: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises December 21: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises December 27: 12-night Caribbean cruise on Royal Caribbean December 28: 7-day Bahamas cruise on Carnival Cruises

Baltimore Cruises

Passports are required for all travelers, including citizens of the U.S. and Canada, who enter or re-enter the U.S. by air, land or sea .

There are a few notable exceptions pertaining to land and sea border crossings:

  • U.S. citizens on cruises that begin and end in the same U.S. port and travel to destinations in Mexico, Canada, the Caribbean (except the French West Indies for certain cruise lines), the Bahamas or Bermuda are able to re-enter the U.S. with proof of citizenship other than a passport or passport card. Acceptable proof of citizenship includes a U.S. state-issued original or certified copy of their birth certificate (hospital certificates are not acceptable) or a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, or a Certificate of Naturalization and a government-issued photo ID (such as a driver's license). Passports are required for cruises that begin in one U.S. port and end in another.  
  • Carnival, Celebrity, Disney, Holland America, Princess and Royal Caribbean cruises that visit islands in the French West Indies (Guadeloupe, Martinique, Saint Martin and Saint Barts) require a valid passport regardless of departure port.  
  • Children under the age of 16 who are citizens of the U.S. or Canada are exempt from the passport requirement for land and sea border crossings. In lieu of a passport, children are able to use a U.S. state-issued original or certified copy of their birth certificate (hospital certificates are not acceptable) or a Consular Report of Birth Abroad, or a Certificate of Naturalization as proof of citizenship for entry into the U.S. by land or by sea. Children entering or re-entering the U.S. by air are required to have a valid passport.  
  • When minors are traveling with only one adult, Holland America and Princess require that all passengers have a valid passport.  
  • A new, lower-cost alternative to the passport, called a passport card, is acceptable for entries into the U.S. by land or sea. The passport card is not acceptable for air travel.  
  • The following cruise lines require a passport for all sailings, regardless of destination or port of departure: Azamara, Cunard, Hurtigruten, Oceania, P&O, Paul Gauguin, Regent, Seabourn, SeaDream, Silversea, Star Clippers and Windstar.

Photocopies of required documentation are not acceptable in any circumstance.

Even though passports are not required at this time for U.S. citizens who sail on cruises to the above destinations that begin and end in the same U.S. port, we strongly recommend that all cruise passengers travel with a valid passport anyway. This is because guests who need to fly to or from the U.S. unexpectedly during their cruise will likely experience significant delays and complications related to booking airline tickets and entering the U.S. if they do not have a valid passport with them. For example, a passenger missing a cruise departure due to a late inbound flight to Miami would need a passport to fly to meet the ship at the next port. Similarly, guests needing to fly to or through the U.S. before their cruise ends because of medical, family, personal or business emergencies, missing a ship's departure from a port of call, or a mechanical problem of some sort with the ship, would need a passport. Of course, situations like these are rare, but they can happen.

Passports are not required for U.S. citizens traveling to or returning directly from Hawaii or a U.S. territory, including Guam, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Swains Island, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

Passports are required for cruise travel to all International destinations not mentioned above, and for cruises that involve air travel that begins or ends outside of the U.S. Passports must be valid for at least six months after the last day of travel.

Vacations To Go has partnered with CIBT, the largest and most well-established travel visa and passport company in the world, to offer you a fast, easy and reliable way to obtain a passport or other document for travel anywhere in the world. For information about obtaining a passport or passport card for the first time, or about renewing a passport or passport card, click here to visit the CIBT Web site.

Legal U.S. Residents (Non-Citizens)

Legal permanent residents of the U.S. must have a valid passport from their country of citizenship and a valid Alien Registration Card (Green Card) to enter or re-enter the U.S.

Non-U.S., Non-Canada Citizens

The following countries participate in a visa waiver program with the U.S., and citizens of these countries must have a machine-readable passport for entry into the U.S.:

Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brunei, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Republic of Korea, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom

Citizens of the countries listed above who do not possess machine-readable passports, and citizens of countries not listed above must present a valid passport and a valid United States visa upon entry into the U.S. For those whose travel plans include multiple entries into the U.S., such as a cruise that begins and ends in a U.S. port, a multiple-entry visa is required.

All travelers, including U.S. and Canada citizens , are responsible for verifying visa requirements with consular officials, and obtaining visas where required, for every country visited during their trip, including countries visited via connecting flights.

Always check with your Vacations To Go cruise counselor at the time of booking to verify the documentation requirements for your vacation.

cruises from baltimore no passport

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Cruise Ships Resume Sailing from Port of Baltimore After Bridge Collapse

The sailings come just days after the Port of Baltimore officially reopened the channel.

cruises from baltimore no passport

Jerry Jackson/Baltimore Sun/Tribune News Service/Getty Images

Cruise ships are once again sailing out of Baltimore, just a couple months after a deadly bridge collapse causing voyages to change course.

The port, which shut down in March following the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge, welcomed Royal Caribbean’s Vision of the Seas on Sunday, followed by the Carnival Pride on Monday. The Vision of the Seas sailed a 5-night voyage to Bermuda , while the Carnival Pride embarked on a 14-day voyage to Greenland and Canada.

“Just a week ago, this terminal was being utilized as an incident command post. In one week, it’s been transformed back to starting out that guest experience,” Jonathan Daniels, the director for the Port of Baltimore, said in a video posted to X as cruisers got ready to board the Royal Caribbean ship in the background. “[The] Port of Baltimore is back — cruising is back. It’s absolutely great to be able to welcome everybody here.”

The sailings come just days after the Port of Baltimore officially reopened the channel following the refloat and removal of the cargo ship that crashed into the bridge. The channel now has a depth of 50 feet and a horizontal clearance of 400 feet.

The port is home to three major lines: Carnival Cruise Line, Royal Caribbean, and Norwegian Cruise Line. Both Royal Caribbean and Carnival were forced to reroute their ships after the bridge collapsed in the early hours of the morning on March 26.

Norwegian, which first launched cruises from the Maryland port last year , previously told Travel + Leisure the company wasn’t scheduled to return to the port until September. 

While smaller than some other homeports, Baltimore hosted 444,000 passengers on cruises out of the city’s port in 2023, according to the government . The port also brings in more than $63 million to Maryland's economy and is responsible for 400 jobs.

Related Articles

Watch CBS News

Carnival, Royal Caribbean cruise ships embark from Baltimore in latest sign of recovery after Key Bridge collapse

By Mike Hellgren

Updated on: May 27, 2024 / 8:05 PM EDT / CBS Baltimore

BALTIMORE -- On the cusp of nine weeks since the Key Bridge collapse, the Carnival Pride embarked from Baltimore Sunday on a 14-day journey to Greenland.

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 The day before, Royal Caribbean's Vision of the Seas left Baltimore for Bermuda—exciting for Colonel Estee Pinchasin of the Unified Command.

"Did you guys notice the cruise ship?" she asked reporters with a smile while on a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers tour of the recovery efforts on Friday. 

Thomas Sitzler and his friends were onboard the Vision of the Seas to celebrate his partner's 60th birthday. It was important that they leave from Baltimore. 

"Our fingers were crossed the entire time. We knew if we couldn't do this now, there would be another opportunity with Royal Caribbean to do this," Sitzler told WJZ. "The whole plan was to cruise out of Baltimore into and out of the [Chesapeake] Bay because all of these people grew up in the area, and they wanted to see all the sites from the water, so it's super cool we're going to go out this way."

Jonathan Daniels, the Executive Director of the Maryland Port Administration, said the economic impact is more than one million dollars for each ship. He noted more than 440,000 people cruised out of Baltimore last year—the second highest number since 2012–and promised more growth ahead. 

"We hate to see any business leave for any period of time, but certainly thank the flexibility that was out there for the industry,"  Daniels said and referenced the temporary rerouting of cruises to Norfolk, Virginia. 

Signs outside the Cruise Maryland terminal  welcomed back cruisers while tropical music played inside the terminal which served as the Unified Command's headquarters less than a week earlier.

After the Dali was successfully re-floated and removed from the collapse site last Monday, Unified Command packed up and left the cruise terminal, but they still continue working and providing updates on the recovery process. 

"We are here to celebrate the fortitude and the work that was done during the last two months to bring cruising back so quickly," Daniels said. 

After the Dali was removed , the main 50-foot-deep channel could accommodate these larger cruise vessels, but for now, there's only one-way traffic—with the opening of the full 700-foot width pushed back from the end of May until June 8th to 10th. 

"We're very proud of the hard work that our team put in to get to 400 feet across, 50 feet down, which allows any vessel that used to come to Baltimore to come in now," Pinchasin said. 

mike-hellgren.jpg

WJZ Investigator Mike Hellgren came to WJZ in the spring of 2004. Solid reporting credentials and a reputation for breaking important news stories have characterized Mike's work. Mike holds a B.S. degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism and grew up partly in both Chicago and Louisiana.

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More from cbs news.

Final major steel truss from Key Bridge collapse blocking full federal channel removed

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Main shipping channel at Key Bridge collapse site set to open this weekend

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cruises from baltimore no passport

Cruise ships set sail out of Baltimore for the first time since bridge collapse

T wo cruise ships set sail for the sea from Baltimore this weekend for the first time since the Francis Scott Key Bridge collapsed.

Royal Caribbean’s Vision of the Sea left Baltimore on Saturday for a five-night voyage to Bermuda, according to Port of Baltimore Director Jonathan Daniels.

“Cruising is back at the Port of Baltimore,” Daniels said in a video posted on X from the Port of Baltimore account.

Carnival Cruise’s Pride followed suit on Sunday when the ship headed off for a 14-day voyage to Greenland and Canada.

“Just a week ago, this terminal was being used as an incident command post. In one week, it’s been transformed back to starting out that guest experience,” Daniels announced in the video, as tropical cruise music played in the background, “The Port of Baltimore is back, cruising is back. It’s absolutely great to be able to welcome everybody here.”

In a news release posted on the state’s website Tuesday, the Port of Baltimore administration had said, “The Port of Baltimore’s permanent 700-foot wide, 50-foot-deep channel is expected to be reopened by the end of May.”

The Port of Baltimore was temporarily blocked following the March 26 collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge. The 1.6-mile structure fell after the 213-million-pound cargo ship Dali collided with the bridge and struck one of its crucial support columns.

In 2023, 444,000 passengers departed on cruises from the Port of Baltimore. The Port supports 15,330 direct jobs and 139,180 jobs in Maryland, according to the state’s website. The cruise industry adds $63 million to Maryland’s economy, the website notes.

CNN’s Kathleen Magramo contributed to this report.

For more CNN news and newsletters create an account at CNN.com

Royal Caribbean's Vision of the Seas departed Baltimore on May 25, the first passenger cruise out of the port since the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge.

First cruise ship sets sail from Port of…

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First cruise ship sets sail from Port of Baltimore since Key Bridge collapse: ‘It’s a good day’

Royal Caribbean’s Vision of the Seas is preparing for the first cruise out of Baltimore since the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge. (Jerry Jackson/Staff)

The festive occasion marked the first cruise ship to arrive and depart the Port of Baltimore since the collapse of the Francis Scott Key Bridge on March 26.

Less than a week prior, the terminal was the headquarters for the Key Bridge Response Unified Command to coordinate recovery operations, Daniels said. They began condensing their workspace down last weekend, started packing up Monday night after the Dali was refloated that morning and were out by Tuesday afternoon.

Maryland Port Administration Executive Director Jonathan Daniels speaks Saturday at the Cruise Maryland Terminal ahead of the first cruise departing from the port. (Annie Jennemann/Staff)

“While there is still work that needs to be done to be able to complete the salvage operation, this is a wonderful sign that the next milestone is pointing to the fact that business is truly returning to the port,” Daniels said.

Just after 10 a.m., the sound of steel drums echoed in the terminal as it began to fill with passengers eager to board Royal Caribbean’s Vision of the Seas cruise ship for a five-night trip to Bermuda.

Tom Sitzler said he and his group had planned the trip since August to celebrate his partner’s 60th birthday. They live in Washington, D.C., but had a very specific reason to sail out of the Port of Baltimore.

“The whole purpose of the cruise though was to actually cruise out of Baltimore out past Annapolis, because Allen grew up there, the birthday boy, and he wants to see Annapolis from the bay,” Sitzler said.

“I’ve always wanted to cruise down the bay and see all the spots where I grew up,” said Allen Steven, the birthday boy.

Cruises that were already underway or were scheduled in the past two months have been rerouted to the Norfolk Cruise Terminal . Steven said if their trip had been moved to leave from Norfolk, they would have rebooked.

A group of five friends from Harford County also were heading on a cruise to celebrate, donning matching pink hats that said “Friends on the Loose 2024 Friends Trip.”

“We are celebrating a milestone birthday,” said Kathy Schlehr. “We have all attained the age of 70 or beyond.”

“Not yet!” someone chimed in.

The group said they were ecstatic when they found out about a week and a half ago they would be sailing out of the Port of Baltimore. The departure location was one of the reasons they went on the cruise.

The return of cruises benefits the tourism industry in Baltimore and the rest of the state, Daniels said.

Passengers board the Royal Caribbean's Vision of the Seas cruise ship Saturday for a 5-day trip to Bermuda. (Annie Jennemann/Staff)

More than 440,000 passengers went through the Cruise Maryland Terminal in 2023, he said, and they may also stay in hotels, eat at restaurants and even come back to enjoy the city afterward.

“Many of them are experiencing what Baltimore has to offer for the very first time,” Daniels said.

The 915-foot long vessel with a 25-foot draft got underway after 4 p.m. and used the 400-foot-wide, 50-foot-deep channel that opened Tuesday in the Patapsco River. In addition to a pilot, it was accompanied by two tugboats.

Even though the Unified Command vacated the cruise terminal, operations are still ongoing, just back in their own spaces, said David O’Connell, the Coast Guard’s captain of the port. They coordinate daily on ongoing operations, including salvage work in the main and outside channels as well as coordinating with the Army Corps of Engineers on vessel traffic in the temporary channels.

Saturday, the Army Corps announced a delayed goal of June 8-10 to restore full access to the federal channel. Officials had previously said this would be achieved by the end of May.

“It was great all being together and coordinating operations, but it’s great to be here and see this place in a different light,” O’Connell said. “You see it lively with people that are going on vacation, going through security, the ship is out back. It’s a good day.”

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  1. Where Can You Cruise Without a Passport?

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  5. Find Out If You Need A Passport To Go On A Cruise

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  6. Norwegian Cruise Line Begins Sailings from Baltimore, Maryland

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    Port of Baltimore welcomes back cruise ships for the first time since Key Bridge collapse 02:44. BALTIMORE -- On the cusp of nine weeks since the Key Bridge collapse, the Carnival Pride embarked ...

  27. Cruise ships set sail out of Baltimore for the first time since ...

    In 2023, 444,000 passengers departed on cruises from the Port of Baltimore. The Port supports 15,330 direct jobs and 139,180 jobs in Maryland, according to the state's website.

  28. First cruise ship sets sail from Port of Baltimore since Key Bridge

    The return of cruises benefits the tourism industry in Baltimore and the rest of the state, Daniels said. Passengers board the Royal Caribbean's Vision of the Seas cruise ship Saturday for a 5 ...