The Lalaurie Mansion

Madame Delphine MacCarthy Lalaurie was a wealthy New Orleans socialite and notorious enslaver. In 1832, Madame Lalaurie moved into a neoclassical mansion at the intersection of today’s Royal and Governor Nicholls Streets with her third husband Dr. Leonard Louis Nicolas Lalaurie. Madame Lalaurie hosted many lavish parties there. However, through the years, information surfaced about her gross mistreatment of enslaved people.

According to historian Carolyn Marrow Long, Madame Lalaurie was first investigated in 1828 for cruelty towards enslaved people. Though court records related to this investigation have not been found, there is documentation that Madame Lalaurie paid for legal services and sold a number of enslaved people following the investigation. [1]

On April 10, 1834, a fire broke out in the Lalaurie mansion. A group of onlookers gathered outside of the home as it burned. According to The New Orleans Bee , the city’s French-language newspaper, firefighters discovered “seven slaves, more or less horribly mutilated” locked inside the building as they attempted to control the flames. [1] The Bee went on to condemn the “barbarous and fiendish atrocities committed by the woman Lalaurie upon the persons of her slaves.” [1] The firefighters brought these enslaved people to the Cabildo.

As word of Lalauries’ abusive actions surfaced, neighbors became enraged. According to The Bee, a crowd of 4,000 people gathered at the Cabildo. [2] Neighbors ransacked the mansion and destroyed what was left of the burned mansion. The Lalauries fled to Lake Pontchartrain and ultimately relocated to Paris. Madame Lalaurie died in Paris, but it is believed her body was brought back to New Orleans and buried at the St. Louis Cemetery. [2]

Today, many tourists visit the Lalaurie Mansion because it is supposedly haunted. Historian Tiya Miles has criticized the manner in which tourism and pop culture have glorified the mistreatment of enslaved people through ghost stories used to entertain visitors. [2]

The structure that stands at 1140 Royal Street today was constructed in 1838 as a private residence and later used as a school and apartments.

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Related Sources

  • [1] Long, Carolyn Marrow. Madame Lalaurie: Mistress of the Haunted House. Tallahassee: University Press of Florida, 2012.
  • [2] Miles, Tiya. "Madame Lalaurie: French Quarter Fiend." In Tales from the Haunted South: Dark Tourism and Memories of Slavery from the Civil War Era , 48-79. University of North Carolina Press, 2015. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469626345_miles.6 .

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Home » Ghost Tour Locations » New Orleans » The Lalaurie Mansion

The LaLaurie Mansion is one of NOLA’s most famous buildings, but for all the wrong reasons. Check out this haunted location on a US Ghost Adventures tour.

You can mention haunted houses in New Orleans without hearing about the LaLaurie mansion. In fact, most people don’t even call it by its name and simply refer to it as “the haunted house.” 

The home has such a sinister past that even skeptics will find themselves questioning if that haunted history doesn’t linger still. There are over two centuries of reports of ghostly encounters happening at the LaLaurie mansion. Some are relatively light, where others are downright terrifying.

You can learn more about the LaLaurie Mansion’s extremely twisted backstory on our tour with US Ghost Adventures. Discover NOLA’s hair-raising history that makes visitors to the Big Easy a little uneasy. 

Evil in Disguise

The LaLaurie Mansion gets its name from its former owner, Delphine LaLaurie, one of America’s most notorious serial killers. She was somewhat of a socialite among the city’s elite. She was married three times and eventually ended up a widower by the time of her crimes. 

Like most of the wealthy in New Orleans during the time, she owned slaves. However, the condition of her slaves were so bad that even other slave owners grew concerned. What threw people off was that Delphine LaLaurie wasn’t publically cruel to black people.

However, it would soon come to light that her generosity was simply a disguise from her true malicious intentions. In April of 1834, a massive fire broke out at the property. 

When responders arrived, they found an elderly cook chained to the stove. She claimed that she started the fire as a suicide attempt because she feared being punished by LaLaurie.

Slavery’s Afterlives

This incident started to raise suspicions about Delphine’s treatment of her slaves. It came to be that she used her mansion as a make-shift torture chamber for slaves. Some of the acts she committed are so gruesome that even the boldest stomachs would turn.

LaLaurie escaped punishment and fled to France, where she remained in self-inflicted exile. Her death was also a mystery, but most believe she passed away hunting wild boars. 

Today, many believe that the spirits of her victims still occupy the home. The strange noises and occurrences that happen at the property are likely those trying to find peace and escape the pain and suffering once and for all.

The home has also shown up in popular culture. The televised series “American Horror Story” references the home’s infamous owner, Delphine LaLaurie, as one of its characters. 

Haunted New Orleans, LA

No doubt, there’s a lot of fun things to do in The Big Easy. Tourists and locals have a plethora of attractions to enjoy, making the city a hotspot of activities for the living and the dead. Heighten your time in town and join US Ghost Adventures for our New Orleans Ghost Tour .  

About US Ghost Adventures 

Since 2013, US Ghost Adventures has offered entertaining, historic, and authentic ghost tours of America’s most haunted cities. We deliver fun yet honest accounts of hauntings across the nation for curious people of all ages. Our ghost stories are based on historical research, but that doesn’t mean they won’t send a chill down your spine.

This video gives you a small taste of what you might experience on your ghost tour — subscribe to our YouTube Channel for more.

US Ghost Adventures also offers virtual tours, a self-guided mobile app, and an Alexa voice app.

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Legends of America

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Traveling through american history, destinations & legends since 2003., delphine lalaurie and her haunted mansion in new orleans.

Looking down Royal Street at LaLaurie Mansion (middle left)

Looking down Royal Street at LaLaurie Mansion (middle left) by Arnold Genthe about 1923.

The LaLaurie Mansion at 1140 Royal Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans , Louisiana is said to be one of the most haunted places in what is called the most haunted city in the United States. If, in fact, this building does house some ghostly entities , it comes as no surprise because of the property’s history of brutality.

“The conflagration at the house occupied by the woman LaLaurie… is like discovering one of those atrocities the details of which seem to be too incredible for human belief.” — The New Orleans Bee, April 11, 1834

Madame Delphine MacCarthy LaLaurie was a wealthy New Orleans socialite and notorious enslaver. She and her husband Dr. Leonard Louis Nicolas LaLaurie bought the property in 1831 from Edmond Soniat Dufossat, which included a house already under construction, and he finished it for them. In 1832, the two-story mansion was completed with attached slave quarters.

Marie Delphine Macarty or MacCarthy was born on March 19, 1787, in New Orleans during the Spanish Colonial period. She was one of five children born to Louis Barthelemy de McCarty (originally Chevalier de MacCarthy) and Marie-Jeanne L’Érable, both of whom were prominent in the New Orleans’ European Creole community.

St. Louis Cathedral on Jackson Square in New Orleans by Carol Highsmith.

St. Louis Cathedral on Jackson Square in New Orleans by Carol Highsmith.

When she grew up, she married Don Ramón de Lopez y Angulo, a high-ranking Spanish royal officer, at the Saint Louis Cathedral in New Orleans on On June 11, 1800.

In 1804, after the United States had acquired the territory in the Louisiana Purchase, Don Ramon was called back to Spain. When he and Delphine, who was pregnant, stopped in Cuba, Don Ramón died suddenly. A few days later, Delphine gave birth to a daughter and soon returned to New Orleans.

In June 1808, Delphine married Jean Blanque, a prominent banker, merchant, lawyer, and legislator. The couple would eventually have four children. But, Jean Blanque died in 1816.

On June 25, 1825, Delphine married her third husband, physician Leonard Louis Nicolas LaLaurie, who was much younger than her. The couple had two daughters. In 1831, she bought the property at 1140 Royal Street, which she managed in her own name with little involvement of her husband. The two-story mansion was finished the next year, complete with beautiful chandeliers, intricate carvings, and wrought iron balustrades. Here, she maintained a central position in New Orleans society hosting lavish parties for other socialites who enjoyed fine food and champagne.

However, the marriage began to have problems, and in November 1832, Delphine petitioned the court for a separation claiming that Dr. LaLaurie had “treated her in such a manner as to render thier living together unsupportable”, claims which her son and two of her daughters by Jean Blanque confirmed.

Madame LaLaurie

Madame LaLaurie

At about the same time, rumors began to swirl about Delphine LaLaurie’s poor treatment of her slaves as many reported them to look “haggard and wretched.” However, when in public, Delphine LaLaurie was generally polite to black people and solicitous of her slaves’ health. But, the rumors continued, and finally, the reports were sufficiently widespread that a local lawyer was dispatched to Royal Street in 1832 to remind LaLaurie of the laws for the upkeep of slaves. However, during his visit, the lawyer found no evidence of wrongdoing or mistreatment by LaLaurie. Madame LaLaurie paid for legal services and sold a number of enslaved people following the investigation.

As word spread, other socialites were no longer eager to participate in their social events or interact with the LaLaurie family.

After the lawyer’s visit, a neighbor reported that one of Delphine’s slaves, a girl of about ten years, fell to her death from the roof of the Royal Street mansion while trying to avoid punishment from a whip-wielding LaLaurie. The girl, whose name was Lia, was buried on the mansion grounds. Allegedly, this incident led to an investigation of the LaLauries, who were found guilty of illegal cruelty and were forced to forfeit nine slaves. The slaves were later returned to the LaLaurie mansion.

Other stories said that LaLaurie kept her cook chained to the kitchen stove and when her daughters attempted to feed the slaves, she beat them as well. This could be the reason that several people reported that Madame LaLaurie’s daughters seemed very quiet and very pale.

Slave Cook

Funeral registers between 1830 and 1834 document the deaths of 12 slaves at the Royal Street mansion, although the causes of death were not mentioned. These deaths included a cook and laundress named Bonne and her four children. Court records also show that LaLaurie freed two of her slaves — one named Jean Louis in 1819 and another called Devince in 1832.

On April 10, 1834, a fire broke out at the LaLaurie mansion. When the police and firefighters got there, they found that the blaze had started in the kitchen, where they discovered the 70-year-old cook chained to the stove by her ankle. Later, she told authorities that she had set the fire as a suicide attempt because she feared being punished. She also told them that when slaves were taken to the uppermost room that they never came back.

Though the LaLauries were separated, Dr. LaLaurie was present at the Royal Street house on the day of the fire.

Bystanders responding to the fire attempted to enter the slave quarters to ensure that everyone had been evacuated. When the McLauries refused to give them the keys, the bystanders broke down the doors to the slave quarters and found “seven slaves, more or less horribly mutilated… suspended by the neck, with their limbs apparently stretched and torn from one extremity to the other,” who claimed to have been imprisoned there for some months. Others said that the slaves were emaciated, showed signs of being flayed with a whip, were bound in restrictive postures and wore spiked iron collars. Rumors also abounded that dead bodies were found in the attic with their corpses mutilated beyond recognition.

LaLaurie Mansion, New Orleans, Louisiana

LaLaurie Mansion, New Orleans, Louisiana

Judge Jean-Francois Canonge was one of the bystanders that entered the mansion and said he had found a “negress… wearing an iron collar” and “an old negro woman who had received a very deep wound on her head [who was] too weak to be able to walk.” He also said that when he questioned LaLaurie’s husband about the slaves, he was told in an insolent manner that “some people had better stay at home rather than come to others’ houses to dictate laws and meddle with other people’s business.”

“Upon entering one of the apartments, the most appalling spectacle met their eyes. Seven slaves more or less horribly mutilated were seen suspended by the neck, with their limbs apparently stretched and torn from one extremity to the other… These slaves were the property of the demon, in the shape of a woman… They had been confined by her for several months in the situation from which they had thus providentially been rescued and had been merely kept in existence to prolong their suffering and to make them taste all that the most refined cruelty could inflict.” — The New Orleans Bee, April 11, 1834

As the news of the abused slaves became widely known, a mob of local citizens attacked the LaLaurie residence and “demolished and destroyed everything upon which they could lay their hands”. By the time a sheriff and his officers tried to disperse the crowd the property had sustained major damage, with little left but the walls. The slaves were then taken to the Cabildo, where they were available for public viewing. The New Orleans Bee reported that by April 12th up to 4,000 people had attended to view the slaves “to convince themselves of their sufferings.”

Investigators later found several bodies, including a child, buried throughout the mansion grounds.

Delphine LaLaurie

Delphine LaLaurie

Several weeks later, the New Orleans Advertiser claimed that two of the slaves found in the mansion had died since their rescue. It stated, “We understand… that in digging the yard, bodies have been disinterred, and the condemned well, having been uncovered, others, particularly that of a child, were found.”

In the meantime, the LaLauries had fled in a fast-moving carriage, first to Mobile, Alabama , and then to Paris, France where Delphine LaLaurie lived out the rest of her life before she died in 1849, at the age of 62.

The burned-out mansion with its gaping windows and empty walls continued to stand in its ruined state for another four years. In 1838, the property was bought by Charles Caffin and rebuilt by Pierre Trastour in the Empire style.

A third floor and a rear building were added in the 19th century and at three stories high, it was described in 1928 as “the highest building for squares around.”

In the following decades, the building was used for different purposes including as a public high school, a music conservatory, an apartment building, a refuge for young delinquents, a bar, and a furniture store.

Lalaurie Mansion, 1906

LaLaurie Mansion, 1906

In April 2007, the house was purchased by actor Nicolas Cage for $3.45 million. However, this was at about the same time that Cage began to suffer from financial difficulties and just two years later the property was listed for auction as a result of foreclosure.

Privately owned today, the entrance to the building bears a baroque facade with iron grillwork on its balconies. Inside, the vestibule is floored in black and white marble, and a curved mahogany-railed staircase runs the full three stories of the building. The second floor holds three large drawing rooms connected by ornamented sliding doors, whose walls are decorated with plaster rosettes, carved woodwork, black marble mantle pieces, and fluted pilasters.

Though today’s building is not the very same one that LaLaurie lived in and cannot be toured, it is a highlight of many New Orleans ghost tours due to its tragic history and tales of being haunted.

Folk histories of its haunting began soon after LaLaurie disappeared from New Orleans, at which time people claimed to hear the phantom screams of her victims spilling from the house in the dead of night.

By 1885, the Historical Sketchbook & Guide to New Orleans referred to it as “Haunted House on Royal Street.” In 1892, the Daily Picayune referred to it as “The Haunted House.”

The stories continued into the next decades describing the property as being haunted by the victims of the socialite serial killer. The tales say that wails of agony plague its rooms at night, doors slam, faucets suddenly turn on, and furniture moves on its own. Body imprints are found on beds that no one has slept on. Apparitions of slaves, some wearing chains, have been seen walking around the property.

The ghost of Madame LaLaurie herself doesn’t appear on the property but has allegedly been seen at the nearby St. Louis cemetery , where she once worshipped.

The mansion and its history have been featured in numerous books and on several ghost adventure television shows. A fictionalized version of LaLaurie appeared in American Horror Story: Coven , played by Oscar-winner Kathy Bates. Most recent plans include that the LaLaurie Mansion will become a central figure in The Conjuring horror franchise.

LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans, Louisiana today courtesy Google Maps.

LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans, Louisiana today courtesy Google Maps.

Today thousands of tourists travel to the city every year to visit this property and others in what is said to be the most haunted city in the United States.

The building stands at the corner of Royal and Governor Nicholls Streets.

©  Kathy Weiser / Legends of America , November 2020.

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The Lalaurie Mansion, located in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana, is a historic and infamous residence known for its dark past. This imposing three-story mansion has been the subject of countless rumors and ghost stories, stemming from the disturbing events that transpired within its walls in the early 19th century. As one of the most haunted and enigmatic buildings in the United States, the Lalaurie Mansion continues to fascinate and intrigue visitors and locals alike. In this article, we will delve into the history and secrets of the Lalaurie Mansion, exploring the chilling tales that have made it a must-see destination for fans of the supernatural and lovers of history.

Table of Contents

Architecture and history of the lalaurie mansion, notable features and artifacts inside the lalaurie mansion, stories and legends surrounding the lalaurie mansion interior, recommended tours and visits of the lalaurie mansion inside, insights and conclusions.

The Lalaurie Mansion is a historical landmark in New Orleans with a rich and haunting architectural and historical narrative. Built in the early 1830s, this three-story mansion stands as a prime example of French Quarter architecture. Its construction showcases a blend of French and Spanish elements, with wrought iron balustrades and ornate moldings adorning the exterior. The mansion’s facade exudes an air of elegance and grandeur, drawing in visitors from around the world to marvel at its beauty.

Stepping inside the Lalaurie Mansion, visitors are transported back in time to the antebellum era. The interior architecture is a sight to behold, with elaborate chandeliers, marble fireplaces, and intricate woodwork throughout the rooms. The mansion boasts spacious salons, parlors, and grand staircases that reflect the opulence of the time. The blend of classical and vernacular architectural styles creates a unique and captivating atmosphere, inviting visitors to explore its historical significance.

As visitors delve into the history of the Lalaurie Mansion, they uncover a dark and chilling past. The mansion is infamous for its association with Madame Delphine Lalaurie, a wealthy socialite who committed unspeakable atrocities against her slaves. The harrowing tales of abuse and torture that occurred within the mansion’s walls have cemented its notoriety as one of the most haunted locations in New Orleans. Despite its dark past, the architectural and historical significance of the Lalaurie Mansion continues to intrigue and captivate those who step inside its hallowed halls.

The Lalaurie Mansion, located in the French Quarter of New Orleans, is notorious for its dark history and haunting tales. The mansion is home to several notable features and artifacts that have captivated the curiosity of visitors and historians alike. One of the most striking features of the mansion is its impressive architecture, with intricate ironwork and ornate details that reflect the opulence of the antebellum era. The interior of the mansion is equally impressive, with grand ballrooms, ornate chandeliers, and beautifully preserved period furniture that offer a glimpse into the lavish lifestyle of the mansion’s former inhabitants.

Among the artifacts inside the Lalaurie Mansion, visitors can find a collection of antique paintings, sculptures, and decorative arts that showcase the refined taste and wealth of the mansion’s original owners. Additionally, the mansion is home to a number of historical objects, such as vintage clothing, jewelry, and personal belongings that offer insight into the lives of the individuals who once called the mansion home. Perhaps the most chilling artifact to be found within the walls of the Lalaurie Mansion is the attic space, where evidence of the horrific treatment of enslaved individuals by the mansion’s former occupants has been discovered. This haunting piece of history serves as a reminder of the mansion’s dark past and the enduring legacy of the atrocities committed within its walls.

In addition to the notable features and artifacts found within the Lalaurie Mansion, visitors can also explore the beautifully landscaped gardens and courtyards that surround the property, providing a serene contrast to the mansion’s ominous history. The combination of striking architecture, historical artifacts, and haunting tales makes the Lalaurie Mansion a must-see destination for those interested in New Orleans’ rich history and the macabre.

The Lalaurie Mansion, located in the French Quarter of New Orleans, has long been shrouded in mystery and disturbing tales. The interior of the mansion has a dark and haunting history, with numerous stories and legends circulating about the infamous events that occurred within its walls. Here are some of the most chilling and intriguing tales surrounding the Lalaurie Mansion interior:

– **Torture Chamber:** According to legend, a hidden chamber within the mansion was used by Madame Delphine Lalaurie to carry out unspeakable acts of torture and cruelty on her slaves. It is said that this chamber was equipped with various instruments of torture, and the horrific events that transpired there have become the stuff of nightmares.

– **Ghostly Apparitions:** Many visitors and residents claim to have witnessed ghostly apparitions and paranormal activity within the mansion. Some describe seeing the tortured spirits of Madame Lalaurie’s victims, while others report feeling an overwhelming sense of dread and unease while inside the building.

– **Cursed Artifacts:** It is rumored that the interior of the Lalaurie Mansion is adorned with cursed artifacts and occult symbols, adding to the eerie atmosphere of the place. Some believe that these objects hold a malevolent power that continues to affect those who enter the mansion to this day.

These stories and legends have contributed to the Lalaurie Mansion’s reputation as one of the most haunted locations in New Orleans, drawing in curious visitors and paranormal enthusiasts from around the world. The interior of the mansion continues to fascinate and terrify all who dare to explore its dark history.

If you’re planning a visit to the historic Lalaurie Mansion in New Orleans, you’ll want to make the most of your time exploring the interior. There are several recommended tours and visits that will give you a comprehensive look inside this infamous and hauntingly beautiful building. Here are some of the top options to consider:

**Guided Tour:** A guided tour of the Lalaurie Mansion will provide you with in-depth knowledge about the history and architectural significance of the building. Knowledgeable guides will lead you through the interior, pointing out notable features and sharing captivating stories about the mansion’s past.

**Self-Guided Visit:** For those who prefer to explore at their own pace, a self-guided visit allows you to wander through the Lalaurie Mansion at your leisure. This option provides the flexibility to focus on particular areas of interest and spend more time taking in the details that intrigue you the most.

**Exclusive Night Tours:** If you’re seeking a more immersive and spine-chilling experience, consider booking an exclusive night tour of the Lalaurie Mansion. These after-hours visits offer a unique perspective on the building’s history and are designed to stir the senses with tales of mystery and intrigue. With limited availability, these tours provide a truly unforgettable exploration of the mansion’s interior after dark.

In addition to the tours and visits mentioned above, it’s important to note that access to certain areas of the Lalaurie Mansion interior may be restricted due to preservation efforts and ongoing restoration work. Be sure to check with tour operators for the most up-to-date information on available options for exploring the inside of this iconic New Orleans landmark.

Q: What is the Lalaurie Mansion? A: The Lalaurie Mansion is a historic landmark located in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana.

Q: What is the history of the Lalaurie Mansion? A: The mansion was built in the late 1830s by a wealthy socialite named Delphine Lalaurie. However, it is most famously known for its association with the horrific acts of abuse and torture that took place there in the 19th century.

Q: Can visitors enter the Lalaurie Mansion? A: The interior of the Lalaurie Mansion is not open to the public, as it is a private residence. However, visitors can view the exterior of the mansion and learn about its history from tour guides and literature.

Q: What are some of the reported hauntings at the Lalaurie Mansion? A: The Lalaurie Mansion is rumored to be haunted, with numerous reports of paranormal activity and sightings of ghostly figures. These stories have only added to the mansion’s dark and mysterious reputation.

Q: Is the Lalaurie Mansion open for tours or events? A: The Lalaurie Mansion occasionally opens its doors for special events or private tours, but these opportunities are rare. It is recommended to check with local tour companies or the mansion’s official website for any updates on public access.

In conclusion, the Lalaurie Mansion holds a dark and haunting history that continues to captivate the curious and the brave. While the interior of the mansion remains off-limits to the public, the chilling stories and tragic events that took place within its walls continue to spark interest and speculation. Whether you believe in the supernatural or not, there’s no denying the impact that the Lalaurie Mansion has had on the history and folklore of New Orleans. Its eerie presence serves as a reminder of the atrocities of the past and the enduring legacy of the mansion’s haunting past. For those who dare to explore its dark past, the Lalaurie Mansion remains an enigmatic and chilling piece of Louisiana’s history.

Olivia Smith

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Haunted History Tours - New Orleans Ghost Tours

A Step Into Darkness: The Haunting Tale of the LaLaurie Mansion

These are the tours you've heard about

As I guide countless curious souls through the mystical paths of New Orleans each day, one place stands out as a spine-chilling cornerstone in our haunted history tour—the LaLaurie Mansion. I am Sidney Smith, the owner of Haunted History Tours in New Orleans, and today I will take you through the dark corridors of one of the city’s most terrifying tales.

Perched at the corner of Royal Street in the heart of the French Quarter, the LaLaurie Mansion is as grandiose as it is eerie. Built in 1832 by Dr. Louis LaLaurie and his wife, Delphine, the mansion served as a testament to their affluence and high societal status. But beneath the facade of opulence, a horrifying secret lay buried.

Madame Delphine LaLaurie, revered for her beauty and grace in New Orleans’ elite circles, held an insidious pastime behind closed doors. Rumors of her brutal treatment towards her slaves began to circulate, casting a dark shadow on her radiant image. However, the full extent of her monstrous deeds only came to light on a fateful day in 1834.

A fire broke out at the LaLaurie Mansion, revealing a chamber of horrors within. Responding firefighters discovered enslaved individuals who had been grotesquely abused and subjected to inhumane conditions. The shockwave that rippled through New Orleans that day remains etched in the city’s collective memory, giving birth to tales of hauntings that persist to this day.

It’s said that the enslaved spirits tormented by Madame LaLaurie refuse to leave the mansion, their anguished cries echoing through its halls after sunset. Visitors report a heavy, oppressive atmosphere in certain areas of the house, sudden drops in temperature, and inexplicable sounds that echo with the pain of the past. Paranormal investigators have captured ghostly voices and specters in photos, further fueling the mansion’s reputation as one of the most haunted places in New Orleans.

Many who pass by the mansion claim to see apparitions in the upper windows, their silhouettes flickering in the moonlight. Others have reported hearing chains rattle and feeling unseen hands brush against their skin. These chilling encounters give credence to the belief that the spirits of those tortured at the hands of Madame LaLaurie are yet to find peace.

As I lead tour groups around the mansion’s imposing exterior, I can’t help but shudder at the atrocities that occurred within those walls. The LaLaurie Mansion stands as a grim reminder of a past we dare not forget and a testament to the resilience of the spirits that linger there.

If you dare, join us on our Haunted History Tour and experience the chilling legacy of the LaLaurie Mansion. Stand where history and the supernatural intertwine, in a city where the echoes of the past are never truly silent.

Sidney Smith is the owner of Haunted History Tours in New Orleans, offering historical and paranormal tours around the city’s most haunted locations. He has a deep passion for the city’s history and enjoys sharing New Orleans’ rich, and often chilling, past with visitors.

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The Real Story Behind the LaLaurie Mansion, New Orleans' Most Haunted Home

tour of lalaurie mansion

At 1140 Royal Street stands what has become of the legendary LaLaurie Mansion, where many of New Orleans' most phantasmic poltergeists reside. Yet what do we know about this mysterious mansion and why is it haunted? This is what you need to know before daring to venture near the LaLaurie Mansion.

Its Name Comes From Madame Delphine LaLaurie The infamous Madame Delphine was born Marie Delphine Macarty. The gentle and sweet daughter of a well-to-do family grew up to be the woman who would later be known as the 'Cruel Mistress of the Haunted House'. Two of her husbands died of strange causes, yet it was her third marriage that sparked genuine suspicion. Madame LaLaurie's turbulent third marriage was said to have driven her to madness in the LaLaurie Mansion, which she inhabited with her young and handsome husband. Reports circulated of the abuse which Madame Delphine inflicted upon her slaves and even her own daughters. The Fire at LaLaurie Mansion In the spring of 1834, LaLaurie Mansion was set ablaze. It revealed the horrific living conditions of a number of slaves who were being tortured, starved, and beaten. The fire was allegedly ignited by a slave who had been chained in the kitchen in an attempt to expose the way that she and others were being treated. Madame Delphine and her family fled the scene. The New Orleans press seized the opportunity to vilify and demonize Madame Delphine. Now, it is believed that most of the spirits which haunt the house are those of the deceased slaves. Two Centuries of Paranormal Activity Soon after the fire, the house was converted into an apartment complex and a tenant was murdered. However, the unusual nature of his death suggested ties to paranormal activity. Even spookier, in the mid-nineteenth century, the LaLaurie Mansion functioned as an all-girls school where students often experienced bizarre and random physical assaults. Today, the LaLaurie Mansion is as stately as it is spooky and remains an iconic New Orleans landmark.

Last Podcast on the Left

Madame lalaurie mansion.

French Quarter Phantoms was featured in Ep 552 of “ Last Podcast on the Left .” Enjoy this episode that goes into great detail about the infamous haunted Madame LaLaurie Mansion in New Orleans and check out their other episodes. For more information about our New Orleans Ghost Tours , contact us today!

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LaLaurie Mansion – Spooky and Interesting!

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The LaLaurie Mansion is a building located at 1140 Royal Street, New Orleans. It is famous for being a haunted house and forms a part of most ghost tours in the city. People need to purchase tickets to be able to get a guided tour of the house. The original owner of the mansion was Madame LaLaurie who was alleged to have brutally tortured her slaves in the mansion. She is often referred to as ‘’Cruel Mistress of the Haunted House’. It is alleged that the ghosts of these tortured slaves are the ones that haunt the mansion.

Who was Madame LaLaurie?

Madame LaLaurie was born as Marie Delphine Macarty on 19 th March 1787 to Marie Jeanne Lerable and Louis Chevalier Barthelemy de Macarty.

Marie Delphine belonged to the Macarty clan which was big, politically connected, and wealthy. Her family members were planters, military officers, huge real estate owners, slave owners, and merchants. They had arrived in America during the early period of French Colonization. As per legend, the patriarch of the family had fled to France from Ireland to escape the religious and political tyranny of the English monarchs. The baptismal record of Delphine was not noted in the register until 5 years after she was born. It is believed that the Catholic Church generally did this when the child was near death.

Delphine was married 3 times. Her first marriage was to Don Ramon de Lopez y Angullo in 1800. He died on his way to Spain. Her second marriage was to Jean Blanque in 1808. The couple had 4 children and Jean died in 1816. Her third marriage was to chiropractor/physician Leonard Louis Nicolas LaLaurie in 1825. Louis had come from France to treat her daughter. She was several years senior to him, but Louis had impregnated her, and hence had to marry her.

Delphine purchased the 1140 Royal Street property in 1831 and the couple moved there with their children. Theirs was, however, an unhappy marriage and profuse arguments between the two were repeatedly overheard by the neighbors. In 1834, Louis left Delphine.

After Louis left her, Delphine had a mental breakdown and this allegedly led her to harm, abuse, and torture her slaves.

In 1833, a young slave named Leia fell and died in the courtyard. Subsequently, Delphine was investigated by authorities and all her slaves were freed. Delphine purchased all her slaves back and all was quiet in the house until the fire of 1834.

The LaLaurie Mansion fire

On 10 th April 1834, a fire erupted at the opulent LaLaurie Mansion. This fire damaged half of the house. It also led to the discovery of 7 slaves who were tortured, starved, and chained in the upper section of the mansion. They were taken to the Cabildo where medical treatment, drink, and food were given to them.

A huge crowd of almost 200 locals had gathered to witness the plight of the slaves. They were so horrified by the scenes that when the sheriff did not take any action for the entire day, they became a mob and attacked the house. Madame LaLaurie had managed to escape before this mob fury. The crowd destroyed what remained of the house and took all the valuables.

The fire had started in the kitchen, allegedly by a slave woman who was chained to the stove. It seemed that she had ignited the fire to bring to light her and her fellow slaves’ deplorable state of life.

Stories of slave torture within the LaLaurie Mansion

Most of the stories that have been told about the haunted house were based on the state of the slaves who were found in the mansion after the fire had been extinguished.

One story is about a slave with a hole that was drilled into the head. A wooden spoon was then inserted in that hole. Another story is about a slave whose bones were broken several times and then set in abnormal positions. Thus, when that slave moved, her limbs stayed bent and crooked, giving her a crab-like gait. Another story is about a slave whose intestines were removed and then twisted around the naked abdomen. Another slave was allegedly found with the skin peeled off the back, thereby making the muscles and tissue visible to the naked eye. There have also been stories about slaves being covered in honey and then later attacked by ants.

Reports indicate that most of the stories associated with the LaLaurie Mansion were over the top and exaggerated. Their origins can be traced to the commentaries and books written after the fire, with the most ghastly ones being in the 1946 book ‘The Haunted House of the Rue Royal’ written by Jeanne Delavigne.

Most local newspapers of those times had reported about the poor condition that the slaves were kept in, but there was no mention of torture. The only paper that mentioned about the torture of slaves being done as a medical experiment was the New Orleans Bee. The informant of this paper was Monseuir Montreuil, a neighbor who was repeatedly spurned by Madame LaLaurie after making advances to her for many years. Hence, he may have spread false stories about activities in the LaLaurie Mansion.

So what is the truth? It is true that a city lawyer did visit Madame LaLaurie to inform about the slave laws and warn her about her treatment to the slaves. This means that she may have been cruel to her slaves. However, the horror stories of holes being drilled in heads, etc. are probably false.

What happened to Madame LaLaurie and the LaLaurie Mansion?

Delphine returned to France after the fire. She died under mysterious circumstances. As per records in France, her death date is 7 th Dec, 1849.

Stories about paranormal and ghostly activities in the LaLaurie Mansion have been circulating for nearly 200 years. Some have reported moaning sounds emanating from the slave room; some have stated that they felt as if they were captured by some kind of negative energy when touring the mansion; while some others have reported of hearing phantom footsteps.

Actor Nicolas Cage had bought the property in 2009 but lost it soon after to foreclosure due to bankruptcy. The current owner of the mansion is an oil magnate from Texas who has been living there since 2012/13.

LaLaurie Mansion – Tour

It is a private property and is not opened for a tour.  People can see the mansion from the outside.  The only tours available are the ‘ghost tours’ where you can walk along the sidewalk outside as the guide tells you story about the LaLaurie Mansion and Delphine LaLaurie.

LaLaurie Mansion – Pictures

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Lalaurie Mansion

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Lalaurie Mansion - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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The Mystery of the Lalaurie Mansion

The stately three-story home at 1140 Royal St. in the French Quarter has been a fixture since the mid 1800s. It currently sits empty and quiet with just a sign hanging outside and crumpled permit papers taped to the windows. The sign reads "The LaLaurie Mansion" in black, spooky type. Tour guides lead visitors to the corner of the building and recount the story of the mad Madame LaLaurie, the Creole socialite who afflicted unspeakable acts of torture on her slaves. That tale has stuck to the home throughout the decades, but some researchers don't believe the hype created by the often dramatized accounts written in newspapers. Evidence suggests that the city vilified an innocent person.

The legend from articles in newspapers like The Bee goes that the LaLauries bought the home in 1831. They were prominent citizens; locally-born Madame Delphine LaLaurie and Monsieur LaLaurie, who was her third husband and a doctor from France, were the toast of Creole society. Madame LaLaurie was charming and beautiful, but rumors began circulating of mistreatment of their slaves. One account claimed that a young girl was being chased around the house by Madame LaLaurie and fell from the third story or roof, and her body was buried in the courtyard during the night. There was an investigation into the allegations, yet Madame LaLaurie had intrigued the detective, and he couldn't believe that she could be that cruel. On April 10, 1834, a fire broke out in the home. When firefighters arrived, Madame asked them to save the furnishings, saying, "…never mind about the slaves." But hearing from neighbors that they were chained, the firefighters entered the third floor and were horrified upon seeing them. The slaves were mutilated and near death, some even the subjects of experiments like sex changes. The Courier Newspaper printed that the slaves were taken to the Cabildo with wounds filled with worms and holes drilled in their skulls. Thousands of citizens brought them nourishment while marveling at their conditions. Outraged by this torture, they formed a mob and attempted to capture Madame LaLaurie, but she escaped by carriage and boat to the Northshore and eventually to France. According to a grave marker found in the mid-20th century in St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, she died at the age of 68 in 1842. Beginning soon after the incident, newspapers slammed Madame LaLaurie; The Bee ( L'Abeille ) even called her "The Lady Nero." The home was changed into a music conservatory, a school for black and white girls, apartments for Italian men, and even a bar called Haunted Saloon, but businesses never lasted long, some citing ghosts as the problem. One owner claimed his furniture kept getting ruined by vandals who would smear a foul black liquid on the upholstery. He waited around one night to catch them, but no one came. When he saw the furniture again, it had the liquid on it. He promptly sold the home. The eccentric son of a French general, Jules Edward Vignie, squatted in the house for years and was found dead in 1892 on a tattered cot surrounded by art, precious objects, and lots of hidden cash. After his demise, an article ran on March 13, 1892, in The Daily Picayune (eventually, The Times Picayune ). Marik Point writes in "The Haunted House" that he wants to dispel myths created by writer George Washington Cable, which Point believed were probably dramatized to the point of fiction for newspapers and books. Point writes, "How much of the story is true, and how much the creation of Mr. Cable's fancy, the old Creoles of New Orleans will tell you." Throughout the article that includes hand-drawn pictures and long descriptions of the home, Point says that the injuries of the slaves Cable described were exaggerated, but goes into great detail of the mob going after LaLaurie's carriage, then killing the horses after she escaped and destroying her home by ransacking then burning it. The bad press kept coming through the decades; more publications asserted that Madame LaLaurie was a sadist. In a 1912 article in The Daily Picayune, Henriette Fuller van Pelt, a wealthy citizen recounting her life, stated, "Madame LaLaurie was a degenerate. I recognize that fact now. She was crazy." It wasn't until 1934, 100 years after the incident, that someone researched beyond the typical stories. In an article titled "Was Madame LaLaurie the Victim of a Foul Plot?" printed in The Times Picayune on February 4, Meigs Frost asserts that Delphine LaLaurie was blameless. Frost uncovered a complex familial connection between her and her neighbor Monsieur Montreuil, who is described in the early newspaper accounts as telling firemen that the slaves were chained. Frost believes that Montreuil started rumors of slave torture, even requesting investigations because Madame was the business administrator of her brother's (L.B. Macarty) estate, which Montreuil was a beneficiary of and had disputes with her over property. He cites numerous legal notices posted in newspapers during the 1840s and 50s from when she sued the executors who took commission from the estate at the Louisiana Supreme Court and won. I also found these notices in the newspaper databases at UNO's Louisiana Collection, with her name displayed on every one. Moreover, this suggests that she never left the city, as Frost says, and moved to Treme. He also mentions that the home was never ransacked because the documents from that time were still there and intact, as well as the furnishings. Later accounts continued to believe there was torture, but softened the blows slightly. A 1970s article about George Cable recounts his book about Madame LaLaurie, saying "…the beautiful but brutal Madame LaLaurie allegedly tortured her slaves." Fred Darkis, Jr. writes in Louisiana History in 1982, "Nineteenth-century authors were not kind to Madame LaLaurie. Undoubtedly, they made mistakes. It must also be admitted that these writers were not in complete agreement with respect to details or bits of information." He believed that the newspapers highly sensationalized the account, which led to a firm belief by most that she was a ruthless beast. In his 2010 book Haunted New Orleans, Troy Taylor describes, "Horrible things happened in this house - horrible enough to earn the house a reputation that still lingers almost two centuries later." He also describes her as "…cruel, cold-blooded and possibly insane…" A pair of writers recently released a fact-based book about the LaLauries, attempting to discredit the myth once and for all, beginning by exploring their early lives to reporting on their deaths. Victoria Love and Lorelei Shannon released Mad Madame LaLaurie in 2011. Foremost, they question why Louis LaLaurie, Delphine's husband, was left out of all accusations and believes that he, in fact, committed the horrific acts, conducting medical experiments on the unwilling slaves to further his knowledge of medicine. They found that Delphine petitioned to free one slave on October 26, 1832, and petitioned for separation from Louis on November 16, 1832, possibly because she did not like what he did to their slaves. Love and Shannon do believe that some indications of abuse were found, such as women with heavy iron collars on their necks, and they assert that the LaLauries fled the city. They uncovered a series of letters from Madame in France to her family in New Orleans and one from Louis in Cuba in 1842. The writers claimed that the grave plaque found in St. Louis Cemetery was a hoax meant to make New Orleanians believe she was dead when she arrived in New Orleans to live out her life, dying in the 1850s. Another grave in St. Louis Cemetery No. 1, the same where Marie Laveau is buried, bears her name with the later date. It's been rumored that a movie will be made about the event, or the home will be turned into a museum. Through all of its incarnations, it was owned in 2007 through 2009 by actor and part-time resident Nicholas Cage, who has been known for his many, sometimes strange, holdings here. It was sold for nearly three million dollars, but further information about the future of the home is unknown. The terrifying story, true or fiction, is forever burned into this city's memory--a scene that was depicted in a gruesome diorama in the former Musée Conti Wax Museum where Madame LaLaurie was shown overseeing her henchman whip one slave, who was bound, while others looked on in horror in a dark attic. The truth will probably never be known, and so it remains the most haunted house in the city and one with a tortured past.

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Moscow Metro Underground Small-Group Tour - With Reviews & Ratings

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Key Details

  • Mobile Voucher Accepted
  • Free Cancellation
  • Duration: 3 Hrs
  • Language: English
  • Departure Time : 10:00 AM
  • Departure Details : Karl Marks Monument on Revolution Square, metro stop: Square of Revolution
  • Return Details : Metro Smolenskaya
  • If you cancel at least 4 day(s) in advance of the scheduled departure, there is no cancellation fee.
  • If you cancel within 3 day(s) of the scheduled departure, there is a 100 percent cancellation fee.
  • Tours booked using discount coupon codes will be non refundable.

Go beneath the streets on this tour of the spectacular, mind-bending Moscow Metro! Be awed by architecture and spot the Propaganda , then hear soviet stories from a local in the know. Finish it all up above ground, looking up to Stalins skyscrapers, and get the inside scoop on whats gone on behind those walls.

Know More about this tour

We begin our Moscow tour beneath the city, exploring the underground palace of the Moscow Metro. From the Square of Revolution station, famous for its huge statues of soviet people (an armed soldier, a farmer with a rooster, a warrior, and more), we’ll move onto some of the most significant stations, where impressive mosaics, columns, and chandeliers will boggle your eyes! Moreover, these stations reveal a big part of soviet reality — the walls depict plenty of Propaganda , with party leaders looking down from images on the walls. Your local guide will share personal stories of his/her family from USSR times, giving you insight into Russia’s complicated past and present. Then we’re coming back up to street level, where we’ll take a break and refuel with some Russian fast food: traditional pancakes, called bliny. And then, stomachs satiated, we are ready to move forward! We’ll take the eco-friendly electric trolleybus, with a route along the Moscow Garden Ring. Used mainly by Russian babushkas(grannies) during the day, the trolleybus hits peak hours in the mornings and evenings, when many locals use it going to and from their days. Our first stop will be the Aviator’s House, one of Stalin’s Seven Sisters, followed by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs — and you’ll hear the legends of what has gone on inside the walls. Throughout your Moscow tour, you’ll learn curious facts from soviet history while seeing how Russia exists now, 25 years after the USSR.

Local English-speaking guide

Pancake snack and drink

Additional food and drinks

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Additional Info

Confirmation will be received at time of booking

Dress standard: Please wear comfortable shoes for walking. For your Urban Adventure you will be in a small group of a maximum of 12 people

Traveler Reviews

This tour exceeded our expectations. Nikolai (Nick), our tour guide, was very knowledgeable, thorough, and has a great personality. He didn't take shortcuts and really covered everything that was on the agenda in great detail. We saw beautiful metro stations and learned the history behind them, including many of the murals and designs.

We did the tour with Anna her knowledge and understanding of the History surrounding the metro brought the tour alive. Well done Anna!

This tour was amazing!

Anna was a great tour guide. She gave us heaps of interesting information, was very friendly, and very kindly showed us how to get to our next tour.

Amazing beauty and history.

An excellent tour helped by an absolutely amazing guide. Anna gave a great insight into the history of the metro helped by additional material she had prepared.

great tour and guide - thanks again

great will do it again, Miriam ke was very good as a guide she has lived here all here life so knew every interesting detail.a good day

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COMMENTS

  1. Can I go inside the LaLaurie Mansion?

    However, if you've found a ghost tour promising that you will go inside "the Haunted Mansion" please be aware that you are not going inside the LaLaurie Mansion. Unfortunately, this is a ploy some tour companies make to reel you in like a fish. I'm not saying that you might not go inside of a location, but it is surely not 1140 Royal ...

  2. LaLaurie Mansion, New Orleans

    Also known as LaLaurie House, this French Quarter spot has a gruesome past involving torture, murder, and acts of brutality. The house is a regular stop on ghost tours of New Orleans and attracts visitors who want to learn more about the property's spine-chilling history. 1138 Royal St., New Orleans, Louisiana, 70116.

  3. Inside LaLaurie Mansion And The Haunting Story Behind It

    After a fire broke out at Madame Delphine LaLaurie's house in 1834, witnesses discovered a secret torture chamber where she had viciously beaten, starved, and killed countless enslaved people. The home at 1140 Royal Street in New Orleans looks elegant. Sophisticated even. But the story of LaLaurie Mansion — so named for its mistress, Madame ...

  4. Lalaurie Mansion

    The Lalaurie Mansion will send chills down your spine just looking at it. After hearing the horrific things that took place in the famous mansion I was horrified. The tour i went on was no less than spooky and suspenseful. It was a great taste of history to get one into the right mood walking through the french quarter.

  5. The Lalaurie Mansion

    Madame Delphine MacCarthy Lalaurie was a wealthy New Orleans socialite and notorious enslaver. In 1832, Madame Lalaurie moved into a neoclassical mansion at the intersection of today's Royal and Governor Nicholls Streets with her third husband Dr. Leonard Louis Nicolas Lalaurie. Madame Lalaurie hosted many lavish parties there. However, through the years, information surfaced about her gross ...

  6. The BEST Lalaurie Mansion Guided tours 2023

    We will walk down Chartres Street from the Napoleon House Restaurant, cross Jackson Square, and reach the Old Ursuline Convent. We loop back up Royal Street at the city's most haunted house, the LaLaurie Mansion, and finish the tour at the St. Louis Cathedral in the middle of the French Quarter.

  7. The LaLaurie Mansion Ghost Tour

    The LaLaurie Mansion gets its name from its former owner, Delphine LaLaurie, one of America's most notorious serial killers. She was somewhat of a socialite among the city's elite. She was married three times and eventually ended up a widower by the time of her crimes. Like most of the wealthy in New Orleans during the time, she owned slaves.

  8. LaLaurie Mansion

    The LaLaurie Mansion still stands on the corner of Royal and Governor Nicholls streets and is a highlight of many New Orleans ghost tours due to its macabre and tragic history.

  9. Delphine LaLaurie and Her Haunted Mansion in New Orleans

    The LaLaurie Mansion at 1140 Royal Street in the French Quarter of New Orleans, ... it is a highlight of many New Orleans ghost tours due to its tragic history and tales of being haunted. Folk histories of its haunting began soon after LaLaurie disappeared from New Orleans, at which time people claimed to hear the phantom screams of her victims ...

  10. Exploring the Inside of the Lalaurie Mansion: A Historical Tour

    The Lalaurie Mansion, located in the French Quarter of New Orleans, Louisiana, is a historic and infamous residence known for its dark past. This imposing three-story mansion has been the subject of countless rumors and ghost stories, stemming from the disturbing events that transpired within its walls in the early 19th century.

  11. The Chilling Story Of The Haunted LaLaurie Mansion In New Orleans

    Built in 1832 by Dr. Louis LaLaurie and his wife, Delphine, the mansion served as a testament to their affluence and high societal status. But beneath the facade of opulence, a horrifying secret lay buried. Madame Delphine LaLaurie, revered for her beauty and grace in New Orleans' elite circles, held an insidious pastime behind closed doors.

  12. The Real Story Behind the LaLaurie Mansion, New ...

    The Fire at LaLaurie Mansion. In the spring of 1834, LaLaurie Mansion was set ablaze. It revealed the horrific living conditions of a number of slaves who were being tortured, starved, and beaten. The fire was allegedly ignited by a slave who had been chained in the kitchen in an attempt to expose the way that she and others were being treated.

  13. LaLaurie Mansion

    The LaLaurie Mansion is a building located at 1140 Royal Street, New Orleans. It is famous for being a haunted house and forms a part of most ghost tours in the city. People need to purchase tickets to be able to get a guided tour of the house. The original owner of the mansion was Madame LaLaurie who was alleged to have brutally tortured her ...

  14. The LaLaurie Mansion: The Chilling Story Behind NOLA's Most Haunted

    The mansion is two doors down from the Gallier House Museum and only a few minutes from another ghostly legend, Lafitte's Blacksmith Shop. It's a frequent stop of many local walking tours focusing on the city's haunted legends and mysterious past. Can You Visit the LaLaurie Mansion? Today, at best, you'll be able to snag a quick pic of ...

  15. Lalaurie Mansion

    LaLaurie Mansion is considered one of the most haunted locations in the French Quarter. You can find many websites full of information about the home and its' past residents. Point of interest only, as the home is privately owned. Whether you are on a paid walking tour or doing your own exploring, it is worth a quick stop.

  16. The Mystery of the Lalaurie Mansion

    The sign reads "The LaLaurie Mansion" in black, spooky type. Tour guides lead visitors to the corner of the building and recount the story of the mad Madame LaLaurie, the Creole socialite who afflicted unspeakable acts of torture on her slaves. That tale has stuck to the home throughout the decades, but some researchers don't believe the hype ...

  17. Delphine LaLaurie

    The LaLaurie mansion, from a 1906 postcard. Marie Delphine Macarty or MacCarthy (March 19, 1787 - December 7, 1849), more commonly known as Madame Blanque or, after her third marriage, as Madame LaLaurie, was a New Orleans socialite and serial killer who was believed to have tortured and murdered slaves in her household.. Born during the Spanish colonial period, LaLaurie married three times ...

  18. Moscow Metro Underground Small-Group Tour

    Tours booked using discount coupon codes will be non refundable. Overview. Go beneath the streets on this tour of the spectacular, mind-bending Moscow Metro! Be awed by architecture and spot the Propaganda, then hear soviet stories from a local in the know. Finish it all up above ground, looking up to Stalins skyscrapers, and get the inside ...

  19. Moscow Metro Tour

    See the best examples of underground Soviet-era architecture on a 1.5-hour walking tour of Moscow's metro stations! With an expert guide at your side, visit five of Moscow's must-see stations, including iconic Mayakovskaya, and learn all about Stalin's visions for the former Soviet Union. Hear about the Metro-2, a secret line said to have been used by the government and KGB, and see ...

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    The Moscow Metro is famous for its elaborate decorations and beautiful artworks. On this tour of the underground transportation system you'll learn about Russian culture, art, history, technology and more, all in one convenient trip. Your local guide will be able to point out details that you might miss if you were traveling by yourself. This is a fun way to travel around Moscow while ...

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