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AMERICAN ROAD TRIP

by Patrick Flores-Scott ‧ RELEASE DATE: Sept. 18, 2018

A compassionate success.

After Teodoro’s older brother, Manny, left for Iraq, the Avila family began to fall apart.

Then the 2008 financial crisis hit, and the Mexican-American Avilas downsized to a dumpy rental home amid a loss of income. Teodoro doesn’t see much hope for his broken family, but news of Manny’s return inspires the Avilas to improve their lives. Spurred on by an old childhood friend, Latina Wendy Martinez, and his Polynesian best bud, Caleb Ta’amu, Teodoro even tries to become a college-bound student. But when Manny comes home, he can’t shake off the shock of war. Situated between the hope-filled election of Barack Obama and the beginning of Teodoro’s senior year, Flores-Scott’s ( Jumped In , 2013) latest explores the fragile bonds of a fractured family through moments full of poignant confession and self-discovery. Teodoro’s funny, wry first-person narration features quick, emotionally charged sentences that provide the narrative a breathless, hard-hitting quality. In hopes of helping Manny heal, Teodoro’s spunky sister, Xochitl, plans an impromptu road trip, ensnaring an unknowing Teodoro in the process. The trio travels all along the West Coast, reconnecting with old friends and family. A final stop in New Mexico offers Teodoro the chance to help his brother confront his PTSD, pull his family together again, and possibly begin something meaningful with Wendy. Featuring a diverse cast of delightful characters, this novel bursts with much-needed optimism.

Pub Date: Sept. 18, 2018

ISBN: 978-1-62779-741-2

Page Count: 336

Publisher: Henry Holt

Review Posted Online: June 23, 2018

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 15, 2018

TEENS & YOUNG ADULT SOCIAL THEMES | TEENS & YOUNG ADULT FICTION

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NO GOING BACK

BOOK REVIEW

by Patrick Flores-Scott

JUMPED IN

CHILDREN OF ANGUISH AND ANARCHY

From the legacy of orisha series , vol. 3.

by Tomi Adeyemi ‧ RELEASE DATE: June 25, 2024

A thrilling, climactic storm with an abrupt conclusion.

In this much-anticipated trilogy closer following 2019’s Children of Virtue and Vengeance , an enemy from a land across the sea carries out conquests to fulfill a prophecy that threatens the entire world.

The war between the maji and the crown of Orïsha ends when the Skulls, a tribe of masked, pale-skinned invaders, interrupt the pivotal battle, abducting Zélie, Tzain, Amari, Inan, and dozens of maji from their homeland. Caged on a ship and cut off from their magic, they have no choice but to set aside their bitterness and distrust to fight for their freedom. Ruthless and empowered by the volatile magic of bloodmetal weapons, the Skulls hunt for Zélie, “a girl with the blood of the sun,” at the command of their king, Baldyr, who prepares for his ascension to godhood during the Blood Moon. As much as she longs to return home, visions and an intertwined fate pull Zélie, along with her companions, to the land of New Gaīa in search of a girl with russet-brown skin and eyes that glitter like diamonds. United goals, fresh conflict, and impending doom provide invigorating gusts of momentum that push the story out of the doldrums of the previous book. On its own, this installment is a suspenseful and compelling expansion of the world, but as a series finale, the conflict seems disconnected from the first two books, and the resolution feels rushed.

Pub Date: June 25, 2024

Page Count: 368

Review Posted Online: March 9, 2024

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 2024

TEENS & YOUNG ADULT SOCIAL THEMES | TEENS & YOUNG ADULT SCIENCE FICTION & FANTASY

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by Tomi Adeyemi

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IF HE HAD BEEN WITH ME

by Laura Nowlin ‧ RELEASE DATE: April 1, 2013

There’s not much plot here, but readers will relish the opportunity to climb inside Autumn’s head.

The finely drawn characters capture readers’ attention in this debut.

Autumn and Phineas, nicknamed Finny, were born a week apart; their mothers are still best friends. Growing up, Autumn and Finny were like peas in a pod despite their differences: Autumn is “quirky and odd,” while Finny is “sweet and shy and everyone like[s] him.” But in eighth grade, Autumn and Finny stop being friends due to an unexpected kiss. They drift apart and find new friends, but their friendship keeps asserting itself at parties, shared holiday gatherings and random encounters. In the summer after graduation, Autumn and Finny reconnect and are finally ready to be more than friends. But on August 8, everything changes, and Autumn has to rely on all her strength to move on. Autumn’s coming-of-age is sensitively chronicled, with a wide range of experiences and events shaping her character. Even secondary characters are well-rounded, with their own histories and motivations.

Pub Date: April 1, 2013

ISBN: 978-1-4022-7782-5

Publisher: Sourcebooks Fire

Review Posted Online: Feb. 12, 2013

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 2013

TEENS & YOUNG ADULT ROMANCE | TEENS & YOUNG ADULT SOCIAL THEMES

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IF ONLY I HAD TOLD HER

by Laura Nowlin

Sales of Print Books Fall in First Three Quarters

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american road trip patrick flores scott summary

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american road trip patrick flores scott summary

YA Review: American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

american road trip patrick flores scott summary

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Book Review of American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

Cover American Road Trip: a yellow background, the back of a car showing two silhouettes inside and one hanging out of the window

About the Book

  • Patrick Flores-Scott
  • Contemporary
  • Latine / Latinx / Latin American (Non-Specified)

Grading Scale

Cover Story:  Montell Jordan BFF Charm:  Platinum Talky Talk:  Deceptively Simple Bonus Factors:  Amazing Friends, Tasty Business, Siblings Factor:  Lost Optimism Anti-Bonus Factor:  War Relationship Status:  I’ll Stand By You

Cover Story:  Montell Jordan

This is a great cover—eye-catching with the contrasting saffron yellow and red letters, a beautifully detailed drawing with Sally the Rambler and the three siblings. The scenery fading around them is perfect, as this trip—and book—are really more about what’s happening inside that car than outside it.

It’s 2008, and it’s been 5 years since Teodoro last saw his older brother, Manny, leave for the Iraqi War. That decision seemed to break the spirit of his family and was the first in a series of downturns that laid his parents off, strained their marriage, and forced them to move into a dilapidated rental in Sea-Tac. But things might be looking up: Manny is coming home! And T just ran into Wendy Martinez and the girl is  all  grown up, whip-smart, and headed to the University of Washington—a place T has no business going, yet all of his dreams now include he and Wendy hanging out at the HUB, together.

But when Manny gets back, though he looks the same, Teodoro can see the tremor in his hands and the way his smile seems strained. He stays in his room all day, drinking, watching TV, and smoking weed (something pre-war Manny would have  never  done). He has bad dreams that include punching holes in the walls, scaring the crap out of T—this  isn’t  his brother. In a last ditch effort to get through to Manny, T’s sister, Xochitl, engages in some light kidnapping by taking them all on a summer road trip. Now is the time to heal themselves, or die trying. 

BFF Charm:  Platinum

BFF platinum charm

So I almost gave Teo a Be Mine charm, but, honestly, he only has eyes for Wendy and they are just too cute together. (Plus I have some proud-sister feels bubbling up for how he’s trying to turn his life around, and that seems a little weird, so we’ll stick with less complicated good buds.) When we first meet Teodoro he’s just gotten off an all-nighter Halo fest (on a school night!) with his BFF, Caleb, and he’s unconcerned with the fact that his grades are so bad he may not be graduating in two years. Dude! But he has determination, I’ll give him that (more below). And while T may not have a clue how to help his parents reconnect, help his sister succeed at her music career, or support his brother after the war messed him up, he loves them fiercely. I got some serious Ryan Atwood vibes from Teo, which I think you’ll understand after reading.

Swoonworthy Scale:  7

If Teodoro is Ryan Atwood, Wendy is way more of a Taylor than a Marissa (thank  GOD ). T has basically an instant crush on this little-nerd-turned-hot-girl who used to drive him crazy when they were younger, but because she lives about four hours away, their relationship has time to develop organically via flirty texts. Teodoro is so besotted with Wendy after they reconnect he immediately decides to turn his academic standing around, getting himself enrolled in an at-risk youth program at school, hiring a tutor, and spending his nights studying instead of gaming. (I mean, if that’s not love…) This decision could have easily felt trite and unrealistic, but it worked for me not only because of the type of person Teodoro is but because he realizes this is something  he  needs too, not just for Wendy, but for his own self-worth. I am a cheerleader for this relationship to succeed, for sure. 

Talky Talk:  Deceptively Simple

Right away, you’ll see that Flores-Scott isn’t into flowery prose; this book is quick, simple sentences and sparse language. It isn’t my preferred style, but it didn’t take me more than a couple of pages to fall into the easy, conversational rhythm. The pages began to fly by without me even noticing. And while the language may be simple, the ideas and concepts presented are most definitely not. PTSD is no joke; Manny—and, by extension, his whole family—is having a hard time processing what he saw and did while he was at war, and he isn’t capable of identifying and requesting the help he needs.

Despite the weighty topic, there was still an underlying sense of hope and some beautiful insights about life, love, and family. This wasn’t a full-on sobfest, but there were multiple moments I had some tears slipping out, even occasionally with a smile on my face at the same time. It’s the kind of book you finish and give a little squeeze before you set it gently back down on the shelf—what, is that only me?

Bonus Factor:  Amazing Friends

Chandler and Joey from Friends hugging

Caleb, Teodoro’s best friend, deserves his own bonus factor for being such a kickass, supportive AF friend. When T announces he is going to try to get better grades to get into college, Caleb literally stands up, unplugs his Xbox, and says, okay, let’s do this together. * heart eyes *

Bonus Factor:  Tasty Business

A green chile cheeseburger

Teodoro’s uncle runs a chile farm in the Southwest and regularly sends his family a batch of New Mexican green chiles. T’s mom makes her super-special green chile cheeseburgers, and all the people who’ve tried them wax poetic about them. They sound  amazing . Is it wrong that I am a little bummed there is no recipe in the back of the book?

Bonus Factor:  Siblings

Brothers Loki and Thor from Marvel movies

While everyone is rightfully focused on Manny and his road to wellness, I’m glad that Teodoro understood how awesome his older sister, Xochitl, was. According to T, Manny may be the glue that held their family together, but I’d posit that Xochitl is the nails you drive in after the glue dries to ensure that shit  really  doesn’t go anywhere.

Factor:  Lost Optimism

Portrait of Barack Obama, former US President

Damn you, Flores-Scott. You knew what you were doing. This book starts off in the Fall of 2008, and you may remember a small thing that happened in November when America voted for its first black president. Teodoro has a great and funny moment where he’s struggling with his newfound scholastic aspirations, but then he sees Obama’s win and it kicks him back on track. Just thinking about where we’ve gone in the last ten years from then to now was…more than a tad depressing. 

Anti-Bonus Factor:  War

A bunch of green plastic toy soldiers

Flores-Scott doesn’t go in-depth about what haunts Manny from his time away, but it’s all too easy to conjure my own worst nightmares. Instead, the real tragedy described is how little support our vets receive after they leave their service. Manny is completely left to his own devices after he gets home, and it leads to some scary moments. At one point, Manny’s family takes him to the VA and they wait for so long they leave without getting help. Luckily for Manny, his uncle is an awesome person and went through his own issues with PTSD, so he may know just what Manny needs.

Relationship Status:  Stand By You

How did you make me care about you so quickly, Book? You’re going through a major life upheaval right now, and I get it. I won’t lecture or prod, but I will be sitting right here next to you when you want to talk. I’ll celebrate every hard-won success you achieve, because you are that special to me.

Literary Matchmaking

american road trip patrick flores scott summary

Heather Demetrios knows how to bring the swoon and the tears as her own characters struggle with making something of themselves in a small town and readjusting to civilian life in  I’ll Meet You There .

american road trip patrick flores scott summary

What is it about sadness and road trips that go so well together? Jessi Kirby’s  In Honor  also deals with sibling relationships, grief, and road-tripping across America.

american road trip patrick flores scott summary

For a book with a little more levity but no less realism, check out Trish Dollar’s  Something Like Normal  about a Marine returning home.

FTC Full Disclosure: I received my free review copy from Henry Holt & Co. I received neither money nor peanut butter cups in exchange for this review.  American Road Trip  is available now .

american road trip patrick flores scott summary

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“American Road Trip” A Book Review for a Great Story

“American Road Trip” A Book Review for a Great Story

Follow the struggles of a family that finds a unique way to help a member with PTSD in the novel, American Road Trip, which is a story you’re sure to love.

The Plot of American Road Trip

American Road Trip was written by Patrick Flores-Scott and was published in 2018. The book follows Teodoro, nicknamed “T” by close friends and family, as he tries to turn his life around and focus on making a future for himself. But there are many things that are distracting him; his childhood friend and the girl he loves, Wendy, is back in his life and he dreams of attending the same college as her.

His parents are struggling financially and have had to move into a small, impersonal rental. And Manny, Teodoro’s older brother, is finally coming home after a long time away serving in Iraq. But having Manny home isn’t at all what T, his parents, and his older sister Xochitl were expecting .

Manny is heavily affected by PTSD, so Xochitl does what seems the most reasonable thing to do: she tricks her brothers into a road trip from their home in Seattle to their uncle’s green chile farm in New Mexico, where she believes that once Manny reconnects with family members and precious memories, he will be able to clear his head of the terrible memories he created in Iraq, and their broken family will be healed.

Family Relationships and Realism

One of the most amazing things about American Road Trip is the depiction of the Avila family. They are not perfect, and in fact, are very fractured, and this fact comes up several times throughout the novel. They cry together, laugh together, sing and dance together, fight together, and eventually heal together. Flores-Scott does an amazing job of beautifully portraying how even though life sometimes gets in the way , sacrifices have to be made for your family.

T and Xochitl make many sacrifices for their brother, including spending their summer with him in New Mexico and putting their own dreams and plans on hold, and Manny works hard to make a change and to overcome what is haunting him. But it doesn’t come easily to the three siblings, and that is another great aspect of the book-how realistic the relationships and events are.

Their family isn’t perfect, and their problems are not solved quickly. It takes a lot to get the family back to having strong, loving bonds, and even then, the ending isn’t one hundred percent perfect, but it is just right for the story and its characters. Creative and Interesting Story and CharactersAlthough the actual road trip in American Road Trip doesn’t kick off until over a hundred pages in, the story is never boring and constantly has interesting moments.

At the beginning of the story, readers are drawn in with T’s unique character and his fantastic character development, as he goes from a lazy teenager with a lackluster future to a dedicated young man who learns about the sacrifices that have to be made for family and how hard work will help secure his future.

Xochitl, the middle sibling, and the only girl is a strong female character who is willing to do anything that will help her older brother, including giving up her dream of singing and playing in a band. The novel intertwines the plot lines of T’s plans for his future, his love for Wendy, and his family struggles, as well as a road trip with his brother and sister.

The road trip is a creative idea that leads the siblings back to extended family members who help the three remember how things used to be. The green chile farm in New Mexico is another creative element that further advances the plotline. American Road Trip thoroughly develops its main characters who all have different personalities and goals, and this leads to a very interesting novel that grabs the reader and doesn’t let them go until the end.

Themes and Messages Found in American Road Trip

Many heartwarming messages and themes can be obtained from this book, including some about family, sacrifice, hard work, love, perseverance, and dreams. The road trip from Washington to New Mexico shows how even though families can become weak and go through rough patches, in the end, they can become strong again and will always be there for each other. T learns how setting goals and having dreams, as well as fighting to attain them, helps him to shape who he wants to become.

T also learned about the huge amount of love he has for Manny, Xochitl, and his parents, as well as Wendy, with whom he also goes through some ups and downs. In the end, American Road Trip shows that even through hardships, families will be there for each other.

This novel has definitely earned five stars out of five and will tug on the heartstrings of all who turn its pages.

This post may contain affiliate links. Meaning a commission is given should you decide to make a purchase through these links, at no cost to you. All products shown are researched and tested to give an accurate review for you.

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Interview: Patrick Flores-Scott

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Today we welcome Patrick Flores-Scott to the blog. He was kind enough to answer a few questions about his writing life and his newest novel, American Road Trip,  which is making it’s way out into the world today. I loved American Road Trip  and reviewed it here last week.

Summary:  A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a road trip in search of healing.

With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro “T” Avila. But he takes some hard hits the summer before senior year when his nearly perfect brother, Manny, returns from a tour in Iraq with a devastating case of PTSD. In a desperate effort to save Manny from himself and pull their family back together, T’s fiery sister, Xochitl, hoodwinks her brothers into a cathartic road trip.

Told through T’s honest voice, this is a candid exploration of mental illness, socioeconomic pressures, and the many inescapable highs and lows that come with growing up—including falling in love.

Have you had any memorable and/or life-changing road trips?

Definitely memorable. My parents drove us—me and my sisters—from our Seattle area home to Wisconsin for a reunion when we were all teenagers. Three hormonal teens squished in the back seat of a Ford Fairmont. Middle of Summer. Vinyl seats. No air conditioning. Two out of the three—mortal enemies. Seventeen hundred torturous miles. We camped the whole way. I definitely drew on that trip as I wrote the book.

I’ve actually been through all of the towns and most of the freeways and highways from American Road Trip . I taught in Los Angeles and would drive home to Seattle for the summer. And I also drove from L.A. to visit my sister and her family in El Paso, Texas a couple times.

I’d have to say that most of my road trips up and down the coast (including a trip to the Rose Bowl with friends in college) were as fast or faster than the trip in the book. It was always about getting there. I still feel that pace and those freeways in my bones. Although those experiences ended up being great for the writing, I’d love to do a slow, touristy version of a trip down the west coast with my wife and kids some day.

American Road Trip  delves into the issues facing a family who is welcoming someone back after military service. Is this a situation you were familiar with or did it require a lot of research?

There are no vets in my family. I was inspired to start writing this story in 2009, after the housing bubble burst and the economy collapsed. I’m a big NPR listener and at that time there seemed to be so many stories about vets returning from Afghanistan and Iraq. Most of the stories focused on the difficulties of adjusting to civilian life and the tragedy of vet suicide and the treatment vets were receiving at the VA.

There was one story that really launched me into the book. It featured a mom reading a gut-wrenching letter her son wrote to her and his dad before he took his own life. I started researching and listening to all the stories I could. Early on I also was moved by this short movie, Poster Girl . It showed a young vet suffering from PTSD. The thing that got to me—besides watching her battle against the overwhelming demons that followed her back from war—was her support network. This small group of older vets took her in. They counseled her and accompanied her to VA appointments and really seemed to be keeping her alive. Those real-life vets inspired Tio Ed and “The Group” in American Road Trip.

There was a lot of digging through stories online and websites where vets would share their stories, often in search of support and camaraderie. Same with websites for families attempting to find resources to help them cope. I talked to vets and family members and with some folks who work at the VA. My father-in-law is a psychiatrist who has had a lot of experience working with vets so he was a big help as well. I worked on the book for a long time, but there were changes made, even at the last minute, because of feedback I received regarding vets and their care. It was important for me to get that aspect of the story right.

The portion of the experience Manny’s family went through when he came back from war that I connect to personally, is that of being a kid experiencing a family member dealing with mental illness. I feel that in my gut. Also, even though no one dies in the book, the threat of loss hangs over the story like a dark cloud. Much of the time I was writing the book, I was dealing with grief brought on by loss in my family.  So a lot of very real, very strong emotion collided with—and became entwined with—all the new information I was taking in about vets and their families.

I also brought to the writing a profound belief that sending a person to war—whether they go willingly, or not—is the biggest sacrifice you could ask an individual to make, and sending a loved one off to war is the biggest sacrifice you could ask a family to make. So as long as we’re a country that chooses to send people to war, we owe it to them and to our whole society, to meet them with an overwhelming amount of easily accessible care, from the time they return home, for as long as they require it.

I love that you focus on sibling relationships and even go way beyond the nuclear family. How did so many family members become part of this story?

Teodoro is the protagonist. But for some reason, from the very beginning I envisioned Xochitl, the sister, being the person who activates the road trip. She was always the one who believed that Manny—who returned from war unmoored and adrift—could find his bearings via a reconnection to long-lost family. That’s no cure for PTSD, but in the story those re-connections do lead to support that is meaningful for everyone.

Also, at one point, the book was going to be, in part, about the role repeated stories and lore play in unifying families. I made up Avila family stories and wrote them in this heightened style, my attempt at magical realism, and I spread them throughout the novel. Each time I wrote one, it seemed to expand the world of the Avila family. When it became clear that the stories were just too much and I had to nix them, some of the characters from those stories found their way back into the novel. Even some of the stories found their way back in, but in a style that fit the rest of the book.  

Xochitl was a new name for me, but I was happy to find someone online who made a video about her name. It is really beautiful in both sound and meaning. Do you know someone named Xochitl or was this just a random pick related to the family history and culture?

I had a student named Xochitl and I really loved that name. My wife, Emma, picked Xochitl for her confirmation name. You’re supposed to pick a Catholic saint’s name, but she went with Aztec instead. (I think it’s so cool that she did that.) It means ‘flower,’ which is sweet, but the written name looks so strong on the page. I wanted to Xochitl, the character to be STRONG. She needed a name that looked and sounded strong. You say, SOE-cheel . A teacher friend told me she had a student who gave up trying to get folks to pronounce it correctly, so she told everyone, “I am so chill .” Doesn’t quite have the same umph .

The book used to start with Xochitl coercing the guys into the car for the road trip and T describing his sister’s name, telling the reader the pronunciation and saying how that name that starts with an X looks as crazy as his sister is. It was fun writing but eventually it didn’t fit and I’m fine making the reader do a little work to find out how it’s pronounced.

Since writing the book, I came to learn that there is a singer-songwriter, Xochitl, out of Sacramento. She is great. Check her out on Youtube. And Xochitl Torres-Small is now running for Congress in New Mexico. Send her your support, people!

Xochitls are coming on strong. Very soon everyone will know exactly how to pronounce that name.

Change can be a challenge at any time in life even when it doesn’t involve trauma. You’ve made a geographical move and a switch in careers recently. What have you learned about yourself through these shifts?

Wow. It’s been four years since I quit teaching and we moved to Ann Arbor for my wife’s job at the University of Michigan, and I’m still learning. I’ve learned that I need to get out and be social. I have a great and loving little family. But I need to reach out more often to the many people who have opened their arms to us since our move to Ann Arbor. I’ve learned that being a writer and stay-at-home dad seemed to really work for me when my youngest son was in preschool half day. Now that he’s in Kindergarten, it’s a long day and I get stir crazy and I’m feeling like I need to get back to a half day teaching job—mostly for social reasons (but also for added income until this writing thing takes off). I’ve learned that I really need a network of writing friends—and I’m SO LUCKY to have eventually found them here. Don’t tell the whole world, but Ann Arbor is a phenomenal town for connecting with writers.

Do you have a special connection to amazing green chile cheeseburgers? 

My wife is from Las Cruces, New Mexico. We go down there with our boys twice a year. About ten years ago, my in-laws took my wife and me to the town of Hatch, and to Sparky’s restaurant, the barbecue and burgers place I write about in the book. That first Sparky’s cheeseburger is what started my addiction to green chile, and specifically, to green chile cheeseburgers. I recommend that everyone travel to New Mexico and eat their way through that state. Enchiladas, gorditas, green chile stew. The use of local chile, green and red, makes it a unique and transcendent regional dining experience. My mouth is watering as I write this. If anything, I undersold the glory of New Mexican green chile—and New Mexican cuisine—in the book. It’s amazing, but you have to go there to experience the real thing.

american road trip patrick flores scott summary

American Road Trip

Book details.

Book American Road Trip

by Patrick Flores-Scott

With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro “T” Avila. But he takes some hard hits the summer before senior year when his nearly perfect brother, Manny, returns from a tour in Iraq with a devastating case of PTSD. In a desperate effort to save Manny from himself and pull their family back together, T’s fiery sister, Xochitl, hoodwinks her brothers into a cathartic road trip.

Told through T’s honest voice, this is a candid exploration of mental illness, socioeconomic pressures, and the many inescapable highs and lows that come with growing up—including falling in love. 

Available wherever books are sold!

About the Author

Tittle- Patrick Flores-Scott

About Patrick Flores-Scott

Patrick Flores-Scott currently teaches struggling elementary readers and math students. He's written for theatre and the slam poetry stage. Jumped In is his first novel. He lives Seattle with his wife and two young boys.

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american road trip patrick flores scott summary

American Road Trip

Patrick flores-scott. holt/ottaviano, $17.99 (336p) isbn 978-1-62779-741-2.

american road trip patrick flores scott summary

Reviewed on: 07/16/2018

Genre: Children's

Paperback - 336 pages - 978-1-250-21165-1

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9781627797412

Patrick Flores-Scott

Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)

18 September 2018

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A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a roadtrip in search of healing. With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro "T" Avila. But he takes some hard hits the summer before senior year when his nearly perfect brother, Manny, returns from a tour in Iraq with a devastating case of PTSD. In a desperate effort to save Manny from himself and pull their family back together, T's fiery sister, Xochitl, hoodwinks her brothers into a cathartic road trip. Told through T's honest voice, this is a candid exploration of mental illness, socioeconomic pressures, and the many inescapable highs and lows that come with growing up—including falling in love. Christy Ottaviano Books

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american road trip patrick flores scott summary

  • Teen & Young Adult
  • Literature & Fiction

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american road trip patrick flores scott summary

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American Road Trip

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Patrick Flores-Scott

American Road Trip Hardcover – September 18, 2018

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A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a roadtrip in search of healing. With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro “T” Avila. But he takes some hard hits the summer before senior year when his nearly perfect brother, Manny, returns from a tour in Iraq with a devastating case of PTSD. In a desperate effort to save Manny from himself and pull their family back together, T’s fiery sister, Xochitl, hoodwinks her brothers into a cathartic road trip. Told through T’s honest voice, this is a candid exploration of mental illness, socioeconomic pressures, and the many inescapable highs and lows that come with growing up―including falling in love. Christy Ottaviano Books

  • Reading age 12 - 18 years
  • Print length 336 pages
  • Language English
  • Grade level 7 - 9
  • Lexile measure HL550L
  • Dimensions 5.69 x 1.17 x 8.43 inches
  • Publisher Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date September 18, 2018
  • ISBN-10 1627797416
  • ISBN-13 978-1627797412
  • See all details

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Editorial Reviews

A Teen Vogue Best Gift Book for Teens A Texas Tayshas List Selection A Washington Evergreen Teen Book Award Nominee A Georgia Peach Book Award Nominee A YALSA Best Fiction List Selection "Told via T’s honest, engaging, and often-naive voice, the story openly explores mental illness spawned by war and how the illness affects family members and those around them. This powerful story also reminds readers that the paths to their dreams may have to take detours but are still attainable. "-- Booklist , starred review "In a story about mending broken ties, making sacrifices, and visiting landscapes and loved ones from the past, Flores-Scott invites readers to follow T on a road trip that brings to life the Avilas’ Latino heritage and Manny’s disorder. . . it celebrates many things: family love, realized dreams, and the taste of a green chile cheeseburger. "-- Publishers Weekly, starred review "Adeptly provides a window and a mirror of Latinx culture and reimagines the American road trip as an individual journey, one deeply anchored in sacrifice for those we love." -- School Library Journal , starred review "Written in T's vulnerable, observant voice, 'American Road Trip' holds true to classic road-trip themes like the emotional power of singalongs and unexpected detours, but it also wades into the darker waters of mental illness with both realism and sensitivity ."-- The New York Times " American Road Trip is as multifaceted as its protagonist, Mexican-American teen Teodoro (known as “T”), wrapping a moving multigenerational story into a endearing coming-of-age tale ."-- The A.V. Club "Flores-Scott's latest explores the fragile bonds of a fractured family . . . Teodoro's funny, wry first-person narration features quick, emotionally charged sentences that provide the narrative a breathless, hard-hitting quality . This novel bursts with much-needed optimism. A compassionate success. "-- Kirkus Reviews " Flores-Scott’s character development is extraordinary . . .Readers will find themselves intimately connected to and cheering for the success of these siblings. With strong messages of hope, survival, and the power of family, American Road Trip is a must-read. "-- VOYA

About the Author

Excerpt. © reprinted by permission. all rights reserved., american road trip, henry holt and company.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4, 2008

Daylight creeps into the game cave.

I turn to Caleb. "We played all night, man. We played all night."

Caleb Ta'amu does not respond. His wide body is sucked into the sofa, long hair frizzing wild, eyes bugging on a flat screen, zombied out on too much Halo.

I toss my headset. Dig through fast-food wrappers on the coffee table. Grab my phone and shove it in Caleb's face.

He slaps my hand, pissed I'm messing with his gamer trance. "What the hell, T?"

"Check the time!"

Caleb checks it. He whips off his headset. "Do not tell me it's tomorrow."

"It's tomorrow, Caleb."

He drops his controller. Hops to his feet. "You gotta get outta here."

We sneak upstairs. Caleb opens the door. He rubs his eyes in the gray morning light. "Second day, junior year. We're off to a stellar start."

"Yeah," I say. "We're killing it."

"You gonna try and make first period?"

"I guess. You?"

"I guess. If my dad doesn't strangle me first. You better go, T."

I hike the sidewalk-less, residential streets of SeaTac, Washington. Drizzle spraying my face. Water sloshing through my shoes. A mile of dark, evergreen-tree-lined streets. Shabby houses, beige apartments, barred windows, rusted cars on blocks ...

I arrive at my destination.

But I can't go inside.

I stand, stuck in this spot on this potholed road, soaking up rain to the rumble soundtrack of Sea-Tac Airport jumbo jets.

They come. They go. Move in and out.

I cannot move.

And I can't stop staring at the dented-up front door of a tiny, falling-down rental house — our tiny, falling-down rental house.

And I can't stop thinking how we got here.

How two summers ago, we rode the happy housing bubble right into a bright blue, boxy, four-bathroom house down in Des Moines. My mom and dad's marriage needed a spark. My dad hoped a big new house would do the trick.

One year later the housing bubble popped.

The whole economy popped.

Orders for Boeing planes slowed way down and Fauntleroy Fabrication in Seattle — where my dad machined airplane parts and my mom was a warehouse clerk — went belly-up.

Papi's fat union check was gone.

Mami traded her living-wage job for part-time work at Walmart.

And we went from being a family that didn't worry much about money, to one that did.

I'll never forget the night last spring. My dad drove me and my sister, Xochitl, ten minutes from Des Moines to SeaTac. And he parked right here in front of this rental. Right where I'm standing. He told us he'd done the math and decided it would be better to hang on to some savings and walk away from the new house now, than be stuck owing way more than it's worth. He'd rather tank his credit for years than put us in a deeper financial hole. He said we'd swallow our pride and move on.

Then he pointed at the dented-up metal door. And said we'd be living here for a while.

The drizzle turns to showers. I take a step toward that door.

But I can't do it.

I can't open up.

Cuz I can't stop thinking about my big brother, Manny.

And I can't stop thinking about us back when we were still living in our old house — the solid little house we all grew up in — the one where we still lived when Manny left us for Iraq. For years, every time I saw our front door, I'd have this hope he'd be inside when I opened up. My brother would be sitting there, smiling at me like he never went to war. He'd be ready to toss a baseball. Take me for a ride in his Mustang. Fishing at the Des Moines pier. Slurpies. Double-scoop cones. French fries and homework help.

I'd see that old door, and I'd feel that stupid hope.

But Manny's tours of duty kept getting extended.

So I gave up hoping for Manny.

And I settled for hoping I'd walk in and catch my parents dancing or cooking together again, teasing each other like they used to. Something would click and they'd remember how good they were before my brother shocked us with his big announcement.

Spring of his senior year, Manny sits us down and tells us he's off to basic training right after graduation. He says he's been planning this ever since those towers fell a year and a half before.

My mom flips. She tells him he can't go because he's headed to college. She tells him he can't kill people for this lie of a war. That's what Mami tells him.

He gives Manny a back-pounding hug. Tells him he's proud and gives him his blessing.

And that's the start of my parents fighting their quiet war at home.

The front doors have changed since then.

But Mami and Papi haven't changed.

Screw it. I'm soaked to the bone and freezing cold. I walk up. Turn the knob. And push in that messed-up door.

My big sister is sitting at the table. Xochitl is postshow buzzed. Scribbling in her journal. Badass in her purple-striped hair and tattooed arms. Smelling like cigarettes and beer.

She shakes her head at me back and forth, dramatic, fake-parental, wagging her finger, then pointing at the spot on her wrist where a watch would go.

I shrug my shoulders. Make a pleading face, playing like I'm in big trouble.

She chokes back a laugh.

I can't help but laugh out loud.

She shushes me, leaves the room, and returns with a towel. Throws it at me.

I sit at the table. She sits across.

It's been so long since the two of us hung out.

And so long since we played Radio Xochitl. I raise my pointer finger in the air.

My sister smirks and shakes her head no.

I bob my head. Oh, yes.

She looks to our parents' room. Mouths the words, It's too late.

I know she can't resist showing off. So I press the invisible power button and Xochitl starts singing.

She's Aretha Franklin. Powerful, even with the volume on low.

They say that it's a man's world.

She keeps her eyes on me.

But you can't prove that by me —

I mime spinning the dial. Xochitl babbles gibberish as stations fly by.

I stop and she belts out norteño — Los Tigres del Norte.

Somos más americanos que toditos los — I turn the dial. Xochitl busts it.

My method on the microphone is bangin' Wu-Tang slang'll leave your headpiece hang —

I spin again and again and she doesn't miss a beat. Dixie Chicks, Café Tacuba, Jill Scott — then serious and intense with some Ani DiFranco ...

What kind of paradise am I looking for? I've got everything I want and still I want more

Even in a whisper, Xochitl can kill you with a song. I poke that power button in the air. Radio Xochitl fades to silence. She's smiling, loving this. I'm smiling. Loving my crazy sister. The doors have changed. Thank God Xochitl hasn't.

Xochitl wasn't quiet enough. My mom woke up and freaked about my all-nighter with Caleb. So today I head straight back to the rental after school.

Xochitl's here, too. She's never home for dinner. I'm guessing she either got fired from selling zit cream at the mall or she quit another band.

Mami doesn't ask questions. We're all home, so she gets to work whipping up her one comfort food specialty: green chile cheeseburgers.

Mami's uncle, our Tío Ed, got married to a New Mexican and moved down there a long time ago. He started farming New Mexican green chile, and for years he's sent us a box every fall. Mami tried out the recipes they make down there, like green chile enchiladas and green chile stew. Those were tasty as hell. But the Avila family go-to became the green chile cheeseburger.

These peppers are not jalapeños. Not poblanos. I got nothing against 'em. But New Mexican green chile was created by the Almighty Gods of Flavor for the purpose of combining heat with cream or cheese and creating ecstasy in your mouth. So Mami only pulls them out of the freezer for special occasions.

I don't think this qualifies as a special occasion. But I'm not gonna argue.

It's a quiet dinner. Nothing but the sounds of faces being stuffed till Xochitl slaps a drum roll on the table. She splashes an imaginary cymbal and says, "I bring you this announcement from Fallujah, Iraq: Manny's coming home! They promised. He's home for good in February."

"How do you know?" Mami says.

"We e-mail. It's all set up. He'll call you with the details."

Mami looks at Xochitl like she feels sorry for her for being hopeful.

We've been burned so many times. I can't stand Xochitl even talking about it.

My dad says, "Vamos a ver, mija. We'll see."

Xochitl scoots her chair back. "We can't wait, Papi." She hops to her feet. "We have to get our act together now. For Manny. "

Barely twenty years old, and she's taking charge. "We have to make this house feel like a home," she says. "We'll paint. Put up prints. Get our old furniture in here."

"Xochitl, stop," I say.

"I'm not stopping. And I'm reinstituting game night. Everyone plays." She points at our parents. "And you two are going out on mandatory dates."

" Xochitl, " Mami says.

"And counseling?"

"Déjalo, mija," Papi says.

"At least talk to Father Michael?"

What is Xochitl talking about? We haven't been to mass in forever.

Then she points at me. "What's Manny gonna think when he sees you, you big lazy clown? There's a world out there, T. Find a passion. Set a goal. And go for it, bro!"

I make a beeline for my room, pissed at my sister for turning on me. Pissed at her for jacking up the volume on our quiet dysfunction.

Before I can slam my door, she says, "He's coming home, guys. Let's see some energy. Let's see some smiles. Oh, and I quit the Art Institute."

"No, Xochitl, no." Mami drops forehead onto palm and shakes her head. "You can't do that."

"I already did."

Xochitl tells them it's great she's quitting because it's too expensive. Plus she can work full-time during the day and help with rent and bills till Papi finds union work again.

"This way I'll be home afternoons before rehearsals to help out," she says.

"We're okay," Papi says. "No te preocupes tanto, mija."

Xochitl looks at the bare walls of the rental. Looks at our parents. Shakes her head. "We have to get right. And we need to do it before Manny comes home."

I wanna tell Xochitl that's impossible. Cuz Manny being here — being with us — is the only thing that can get us right.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2008

Breaks squeal. Rubber doors slap open. I hop a bus headed for Seattle. I do not care where.

It's been a whole week of my sister telling us stuff we already know about how bad we suck. A whole week of her taking charge in a way our parents should be taking charge.

Plus, she bought Risk. And tonight she will open that box. My mom will grumble as Xochitl explains the rules. Papi will ask a ton of questions. Xochitl will try very hard to explain. Mami will roll eyes at both of them. Then Xochitl will bawl them out like she's the parent.

If I'm there, I'll get pissed and walk out and my sister will throw down another lecture about my lame life. And the whole night will be a confirmation that Manny's still gone, my parents are a lost cause, and Xochitl has flipped and she's no longer my sister.

I flash the driver my pass. He nods. The breaks exhale. The engine rumbles and jerks us into traffic.

I would be over at Caleb's, but his dad got on his case after our all-nighter. Kennedy Ta'amu told Caleb it was time to get a life. Play a sport. Volunteer at church. Get a job. So now he's working a couple nights as a dishwasher at Vince's Pizza.

The bus winds its way north. Up Pac Highway. Past Sea-Tac Airport. Onto 405, then I-5. Into Seattle. The U District. The University of Washington campus.

I hop off at the Husky Union Building — the HUB — a brick, ivy-covered, dry place to kill some time.

I pull open the old wooden doors, walk past a bike shop, past a little branch of University Book Store, into a big open corridor. College kids lounge at tables and couches. They flirt. Surf the web. Read important novels. Argue about important things.

I head over to a newsstand to grab a Coke. I pay the lady and turn to go. No big deal.

But I almost bump into the girl behind me cuz she's on one knee tying her laces. She's got this shiny, dark brown hair hanging down so I can't see her face, but I got a feeling she might be cute and I want to find out.

So I fake sneeze.

The girl springs to her feet. "Do everyone a favor and cover that stuff up."

All I've got are uh s and um s because she is, in fact, kind of cute. Cute cheeks. Cute scowl as she stands there with cute brown eyes staring at me through long lashes and black dork glasses.

"Sorry about that," I say as I walk away fast.

"You wait, mister." She grabs me by the arm and examines my face.

And I'm like, "What?"

And she's like, "Your momma taught you better than that."

"Excuse me? My momma ?"

"Yeah. She taught you better."

"Leave my momma outta this cuz you don't know my momma."

Then she slips a bit of a wicked smile. "I think maybe I know your mamá."

I can't help but slip some of my smile and say, "How you think you know my mamá?"

And she says — her smile growing bigger — "Summers in Florence, Oregon. My great-uncle Frank's place."

I'm frozen stupid as time and space mess with my head.

This is Wendy Martinez, Frank O'Brien's grandniece.

But the Wendy Martinez from way-back summers was not cute. She was a bossy little busybody who chased me around and drove me nuts and — I'll admit it — I was a tiny bit scared of the little Wendy.

"You had better manners back then," she says. She busts out a full-on smile. "Teodoro Avila! Dude! Hug it out!"

We go in for the hug. Wrap arms like people do and ...

This hug. It's like firm? But soft and warm.

I turn to jelly in Wendy's arms as she squeezes tighter and my mind — everything fades and this is all there is. Me wrapped around Wendy. Wendy wrapped around me.

Then both of us — at the same exact time — inhale deep and fast and look big eyes right into each other.

That breath, those eyes — it's all way too much. So we let go and step back.

"My mom's at the bookstore," she says. "You have a second to talk?"

"I have lots of seconds," I say. But I'm thinking, I got the rest of my life, Wendy Martinez.

We find a bright spot in the atrium. We sit across a table from each other. Smile some nervous smiles. Then Wendy asks me about the family.

I tell her to go first.

Wendy says she and her mom still live a couple hours away in Vancouver, across the river from Portland. She's here at the University of Washington looking into a scholarship for women in science. She says this is the place to study health care. She's thinking about med school already. Wendy's got all the data and all her stuff one hundred percent together.

Before I know it, she asks me what I'm doing here.

I start telling Wendy about staying away from game night, but that feels way too complicated. So I sneeze again — I cover up this time — and I tell her that I am also here checking out the University of Washington, only I call it U-Dub so she knows I know people call it that.

And I say it with a straight face. As if I believed they would let me into the University of Washington. For actual college.

That's the first of my lies as I try to convince beautiful and brilliant Wendy Martinez that my parents are doing great. Xochitl's got a great music career going and she's doing awesome in art school. And I'm carefully considering my many college options before making my decision.

The thing about Wendy — besides her smile, her hair, her not-skinny curves, and those smart-girl glasses — is she is so full of caring. Like when the subject of Manny comes up and I tell her how bad I miss him. How scared I am he might never come back. Wendy looks me in the eyes as I talk. Touches my hand to make a point. Asks me if I'm okay — like really okay.

And when a stupid tear slips when I say I miss him, she acts like it's nothing. She just reaches over and wipes it away with a finger midsentence and says she can't imagine how stressful the waiting must be. How difficult it must be on all of us that Manny keeps getting redeployed. How much she hopes he makes it back.

When people try to make us feel better about Manny, they say, Everything's going to be okay. God has a plan. Everything happens for a reason.

Wendy doesn't say any of that BS. She gets that it's way more complicated. And that makes me like her even more.

In a minute, Wendy's mom walks our way. Rebecca O'Brien acts thrilled to see me. She asks how the family is and I keep my lies straight as Wendy takes off running. We watch her go and I'm about to ask, but Rebecca sighs and says, "You never know with that girl."

Rebecca tells me Uncle Frank misses us terribly. She says it'd be great if we all spent a week in Florence, like old times. I tell her I'll let Mami and Papi know.

Pretty soon, Wendy's standing there again, one hand hidden behind her back.

Rebecca edges away and it's clear they have to go.

I don't want this moment to end, so I say, "Wendy, being here, soaking this place in, I think this old U-Dub might be tops on my list."

"That's awesome," she says. "It'd be great if we both went here."

Then I totally lose it and I tell Wendy if she comes here, I'm coming here.

Product details

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) (September 18, 2018)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Hardcover ‏ : ‎ 336 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1627797416
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1627797412
  • Reading age ‏ : ‎ 12 - 18 years
  • Lexile measure ‏ : ‎ HL550L
  • Grade level ‏ : ‎ 7 - 9
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 14.9 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 5.69 x 1.17 x 8.43 inches
  • #805 in Teen & Young Adult Fiction on Depression & Mental Health (Books)
  • #2,785 in Teen & Young Adult Coming of Age Fiction
  • #280,418 in Children's Books (Books)

About the author

Patrick flores-scott.

Patrick Flores-Scott was, until recently, a long-time public school teacher in Seattle, Washington. He’s now a stay-at-home dad and early morning writer in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Patrick’s first novel, Jumped In, has been named to the 2014 YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults list, an NCSS/CBC Notable Book for the Social Studies, a Bank Street College Best Books of 2014 list and one of five finalists for the National Council for the Teachers of English Walden Award for YA Book of the Year for 2014.He is currently working on his second book, American Road Trip.

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Customers find the book a good read with a powerful storyline.

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"This is one of the best books I have read in ages. It is an honest look at the complexities of family and friends...." Read more

"Really enjoyed it. Good read for teens " Read more

" It's a good read ." Read more

Customers find the storyline powerful, great, and full of life. They also say the characters are compelling and willing to risk it all.

"...It is fast moving and full of life . Flores-Scott is storyteller." Read more

"...The author rolls out the story in a very intimate manor ...." Read more

"This is a story of love , trust and determination. I saw two siblings working together to protect the eldest sibling...." Read more

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american road trip patrick flores scott summary

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VIDEO

  1. USA Road Trip Vlog: Driving Through the Heart of Americ

  2. Early Road Trips With "American Journey" Author Wes Davis

  3. Please remember Archbishop Patrick Flores

  4. nhfplTeen BookTalk: American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

  5. Summer Season 2024! Special Event with Patrick Flores Scott No Going Back

  6. Eventide Audio

COMMENTS

  1. Review: American Road Trip

    Title: American Road Trip Author: Patrick Flores-Scott Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) Pages: 336 Genre: Contemporary Review copy: Digital ARC via Netgalley Availability: Releases Sept. 18, 2018 Summary: A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a road trip in search of healing. With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the ...

  2. American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

    Patrick Flores-Scott is the acclaimed author of the award-winning novels Jumped In and American Road Trip, which was named a YALSA Best Fiction Book, a TAYSHAS Reading List Selection, an SLJ National Hispanic Heritage Month pick, and a Teen Vogue Best Gift Book, and was licensed to WEBTOON for graphic digital serialization.

  3. AMERICAN ROAD TRIP

    AMERICAN ROAD TRIP. by Patrick Flores-Scott ‧ RELEASE DATE: Sept. 18, 2018. A compassionate success. ... Flores-Scott's (Jumped In, 2013) latest explores the fragile bonds of a fractured family through moments full of poignant confession and self-discovery. Teodoro's funny, wry first-person narration features quick, emotionally charged ...

  4. PDF American road trip

    Names: Flores-Scott, Patrick, author. Title: American road trip / Patrick Flores-Scott. Description: First edition. | New York : Christy Ottaviano Books, Henry Holt and Company, 2018. | Summary: Brothers Teodoro and Manny Avila take a road trip to address Manny's PTSD following his tour in Iraq, and to help T change his life and win the heart

  5. American Road Trip

    American Road Trip - PATRICK FLORES-SCOTT. It was the fall of 2009. My agent started sending the Jumped In manuscript to editors. He told me it was time to get to work on the next book. It didn't take me long to decide that I wanted to explore how kids were dealing with the fallout from the economic recession.

  6. YA Review: American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

    Title: American Road Trip. Author: Patrick Flores-Scott. Year Published: 2018. Genre: YA fiction. Pages: 323. Rating: 4.5 out of 5. Location ( my 2019 Google Reading map): USA (WA, NM) FTC Disclosure: I bought this book with my own money. Summary (from the inside flap of the book): With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and ...

  7. American Road Trip

    Book Review of American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott. By: Stephanie Johnston | September 06, 2018 About the Book. Title: American Road Trip. Author: Patrick Flores-Scott; Published: 2018. Genre: Contemporary; Swoonworthy Scale: 7. Voices: Cis Boy; Latine / Latinx / Latin American (Non-Specified) ...

  8. "American Road Trip" A Book Review for a Great Story

    The Plot of American Road Trip. American Road Trip was written by Patrick Flores-Scott and was published in 2018. The book follows Teodoro, nicknamed "T" by close friends and family, as he tries to turn his life around and focus on making a future for himself. But there are many things that are distracting him; his childhood friend and the ...

  9. PDF American Road Trip

    AMERICAN ROAD TRIP About the book: With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with ... Patrick Flores-Scott is a former public school teacher and current stay-at-home dad and early morning ... about Patrick by accessing www.patrickfloresscott.com. ISBN-10: 9781627797412 ISBN-13: 978-1627797412

  10. American Road Trip

    This novel bursts with much-needed optimism. A compassionate success. "--Kirkus Reviews "Flores-Scott's character development is extraordinary. . .Readers will find themselves intimately connected to and cheering for the success of these siblings. With strong messages of hope, survival, and the power of family, American Road Trip is a must-read.

  11. Amazon.com: American Road Trip eBook : Flores-Scott, Patrick: Kindle Store

    by Patrick Flores-Scott (Author) Format: Kindle Edition. 4.6 115 ratings. See all formats and editions. A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a roadtrip in search of healing. With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro "T ...

  12. American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

    A novel by Patrick Flores-Scott A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a road trip in search of healing. With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro "T" Avila.

  13. American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott, Paperback

    Patrick Flores-Scott is the author of the award-winning novel Jumped In. He currently teaches struggling elementary readers and math students. ... American Road Trip holds true to classic road-trip themes like the emotional power of singalongs and unexpected detours, but it also wades into the darker waters of mental illness with both realism ...

  14. Interview: Patrick Flores-Scott

    Today we welcome Patrick Flores-Scott to the blog. He was kind enough to answer a few questions about his writing life and his newest novel, American Road Trip, which is making it's way out into the world today.I loved American Road Trip and reviewed it here last week.. Summary: A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a road trip in search of healing.

  15. American Road Trip

    A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a roadtrip in search of healing.

  16. American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

    American Road Trip Patrick Flores-Scott. Holt/Ottaviano, $17.99 (336p) ISBN 978-1-62779-741-2. The past few years have brought many hardships to Teodoro Avila, known as T, and his family. But ...

  17. American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott (ebook)

    A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a roadtrip in search of healing.With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro "T" Avila. But he takes some hard hits the summer before senior year when his nearly perfect brother, Manny, returns from a tour in Iraq with a devastating ...

  18. American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

    Get your copy of American Road Trip by Flores-Scott, Patrick at Book Outlet! Enjoy amazing savings on this captivating read. ... T's fiery sister, Xochitl, hoodwinks her brothers into a cathartic road trip. Told through T's honest voice, this is a candid exploration of mental illness, socioeconomic pressures, and the many inescapable highs ...

  19. American Road Trip by Patrick Flores-Scott

    American Road Trip ebook By Patrick Flores-Scott. Read a Sample. Sign up to save your library ... Save Not today. Format. ebook. ISBN. 9781627797412. Author. Patrick Flores-Scott. Publisher. Henry Holt and Co. (BYR) Release. 18 September 2018. Share. Subjects Young Adult Fiction Young Adult Literature. Find this title in Libby, the library ...

  20. Amazon.com: American Road Trip: 9781627797412: Flores-Scott, Patrick: Books

    American Road Trip. Hardcover - September 18, 2018. A heartwrenching YA coming of age story about three siblings on a roadtrip in search of healing. With a strong family, the best friend a guy could ask for, and a budding romance with the girl of his dreams, life shows promise for Teodoro "T" Avila. But he takes some hard hits the summer ...

  21. Bio

    Patrick Flores-Scott was a long-time public school teacher in Seattle, Washington. He's now a stay-at-home dad and early morning writer in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... and a Bank Street College Best Books of 2014. His second novel, American Road Trip, received multiple starred reviews and is a 2019 Best Fiction for Young Adults pick, and was ...

  22. PATRICK FLORES-SCOTT

    Patrick Flores-Scott, YA author. ... American Road Trip BooKshop.org. IndieBound. BarnES and NOble. NO GOING BACK April of 2024! A Junior Library Guild Gold Standard Selection!!! "Powerful…. The excellent pacing and heart-wrenching exploration of redemption will sweep readers up."--Kirkus Reviews